bunk

(redirected from bunking)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to bunking: bunking off

a lot of bunk

Nonsense or insincerity. Bunk is an abbreviation of the Americanism "bunkum," meaning insincere, empty talk, or disingenuous political talk meant merely to please a target audience. Primarily heard in US. In my opinion, most of what a politician promises during a campaign is just a lot of bunk.
See also: bunk, lot, of

a load of bunk

Nonsense or insincerity. Bunk is an abbreviation of the Americanism "bunkum," meaning insincere, empty talk, or disingenuous political talk meant merely to please a target audience. Primarily heard in US. The plumber said it would cost $800 to fix the toilet? What a load of bunk!
See also: bunk, load, of

do a bunk

To flee, leave hurriedly, or abscond, especially under illegal or suspicious circumstances. Primarily heard in UK. We did a bunk as soon as we heard the police sirens.
See also: bunk

bunk (something)

To absent oneself or leave early from something (usually school or work) when one would normally be required to be there; to play truant. Primarily heard in UK. I was so restless and bored at work that I decided to just bunk it after lunch without telling anyone. Hey, Jim and I are planning on bunking from school on Friday, do you want to come with us? That's the last time you bunk class, mister! From now on, I'm dropping you to school every morning!
See also: bunk

bunk off

To absent oneself or leave early from school or work when one would normally be required to be there; to play truant. Primarily heard in UK. I was so restless and bored at work that I decided to just bunk off after lunch without telling anyone. Hey, Jim and I are planning on bunking off from school on Friday, do you want to come with us? That's the last time you bunk off class, mister! From now on, I'm dropping you off to school every morning!
See also: bunk, off

bunked

Very intoxicated. Do you remember last night at all? You were bunked!
See also: bunk

bunk down (for the night)

To go to bed. It's time for the kids to bunk down for the night. Janet was so tired after her trip that she bunked down as soon as she got home.
See also: bunk, down

bunk (up) together

To share a room, bed, or other sleeping space with another person. You two will need to bunk together because we weren't able to reserve enough hotel rooms for everyone. I'll never forget the motley crew I bunked up together with at camp that summer.
See also: bunk, together

bunk (up) with (someone)

To share a room, bed, or other sleeping space with another person. You will need to bunk up with your sister because we weren't able to reserve enough hotel rooms for everyone. They became my best friends after I bunked with them at camp.
See also: bunk

bunk down (for the night)

to bed down for the night; to go to bed. Where are you going to bunk down for the night? I'm tired and ready to bunk down.
See also: bunk, down

bunk (up) together

[for two or more people] to share a bed, a bedroom, or a tent. Shall we bunk together? My tent is big and you can bunk up with me.
See also: bunk, together

bunk (up) with someone

to share a bed, a bedroom, or a tent with someone. Are you going to bunk up with Fred? I'll bunk with Todd.
See also: bunk

bunk up

v.
To share a bed or sleeping accommodations, especially temporarily: Before they moved to a bigger house, she had to bunk up with her sister. The campers would bunk up together if it got too cold.
See also: bunk, up

bunked

mod. drunk. That’s enough. You’re bunked.
See also: bunk