bundle

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bundle of energy

Someone who is exceptionally energetic, alert, productive, or hyperactive. My kids are always such bundles of energy first thing in the morning. Susan is a bundle of energy! She's already finished two of her essays today and is beginning to work on a third.
See also: bundle, energy, of

bundle of laughs

Fun, funny, and pleasant. Often used sarcastically to indicate that someone is unpleasant or not enjoyable to be around. A: "Is Mr. Grant always cranky?" B: "Oh, yeah—he's a real bundle of laughs!" I always have so much fun when Katie's around—she's totally a bundle of laughs!
See also: bundle, laugh, of

bundle of joy

A newborn baby. We threw a baby shower for Jessica today so she can get all she needs in preparation for her little bundle of joy.
See also: bundle, joy, of

blow a bundle

(on someone) Go to drop a bundle (on someone).
See also: blow, bundle

bundle of joy

 and bundle from heaven
Fig. a baby. We are expecting a bundle of joy next September. When your little bundle from heaven arrives, things will be a little hectic for a while.
See also: bundle, joy, of

bundle of nerves

a very nervous person. I was a bundle of nerves before my dental appointment.
See also: bundle, nerve, of

bundle off

to leave in a hurry; to take all one's parcels or baggage and leave in a hurry. She got ready and bundled off after her bus. Her arms full, Lily bundled off in a rush.
See also: bundle, off

bundle (oneself) up (against something)

to wrap oneself up in protective clothing or bedding as protection against the cold. Please bundle yourself up against the frigid wind. Bundle up before you go outside.
See also: bundle, up

bundle someone into something

 
1. to put someone, usually a child, into heavy outdoor clothing. Bill bundled Billy into his parka. Tom bundled himself into his parka and opened the door to go out.
2. and bundle someone in to put someone, usually a child, into bed. She bundled Sarah into bed after reading her a story. June pulled the sheets back and bundled Sarah in.
See also: bundle

bundle someone off (to some place)

Fig. to send someone, usually a child, somewhere. Robert bundled the children off to school. They bundled off the kids and were able to relax.
See also: bundle, off

bundle someone up (in something)

to wrap someone up in protective clothing or bedding. Bill bundled Billy up in his parka. Bill bundled up Mary in her parka.
See also: bundle, up

bundle someone up (in something)

to wrap someone up in protective clothing or bedding. Bill bundled Billy up in his parka. Bill bundled up Mary in her parka.
See also: bundle, up

bundle something off (to someone or some place)

to send something off in a bundle to someone. He bundled his laundry off to his mother, who would wash it for him. Mary bundled off the package to her brother.
See also: bundle, off

drop a bundle

(on someone) and blow a bundle (on someone ) Inf. to spend a lot of money pleasing or entertaining someone. I blew a bundle on the candidate, and it didn't help me at all. Over the years, I've dropped a bundle on clients at that restaurant.
See also: bundle, drop

drop a bundle (on something)

Inf. to pay a lot of money for something. Pete dropped a bundle on this car. I always buy old used cars. I've never dropped a bundle on any car.
See also: bundle, drop

lose a bundle

Sl. to lose a lot of money. Don lost a bundle on that land purchase. I know I would lose a bundle if I went to a casino and gambled.
See also: bundle, lose

make a bundle

 and make a pile
to make a lot of money. John really made a bundle on that deal. I'd like to make a pile and retire.
See also: bundle, make

save a bundle (on something)

Fig. to save a lot of money on the purchase of something. I managed to save a bundle on a car by buying a used one.
See also: bundle, save

bundle up (somebody)

also bundle somebody up
to put coats and other warm clothes on someone In the winter you have to bundle up, because it gets really cold. Her mom bundled her up in a down parka, with a knit cap under the hood.
See also: bundle, up

a bundle of joy

  (informal)
a baby Three days after the birth, Sandra took home her little bundle of joy.
See also: bundle, joy, of

not be a bundle of laughs

  (informal)
to not be entertaining or enjoyable She's not a bundle of laughs, your cousin. The funeral wasn't exactly a bundle of laughs.
See also: bundle, laugh, of

not go a bundle on something

  (British informal)
to not like something I don't go a bundle on Anne's new haircut.
See be a bundle of nerves
See also: bundle, on

be a bundle of nerves

  (British, American & Australian informal) also be a bag of nerves (British informal)
to be very nervous You should have seen me before the interview. I was a bundle of nerves.
See also: bundle, nerve, of

bundle of nerves

Extremely jittery, tense, or fearful person, as in For months after the accident, Aunt Jane was a bundle of nerves. [1930s]
See also: bundle, nerve, of

make a bundle

Also, make a pile. Make a great deal of money, as in When the market went up they made a bundle, or He made a pile from that department store. The first term, dating from about 1900, comes from the somewhat earlier use of bundle for a roll of banknotes. The variant, alluding to a heap of money, was first recorded in 1864.
See also: bundle, make

bundle off

v.
1. To send something somewhere or to someone in a tightly wrapped package: Bundle off those boxes of books for storage in the attic. I bundled my laundry off to the cleaners.
2. To send someone to some place, especially in a hurry or without his or her consent: She bundled the kids off to their grandparents' house for the holiday.
3. bundle off to To depart for some place: I bundled off to catch my flight.
See also: bundle, off

bundle up

v.
1. To gather or tie something together in a tight package: He bundled up his belongings and left for college. She bundled her manuscript up and sent it to the publisher.
2. To wrap someone snugly in warm clothes or blankets: She bundled up the baby and laid him in the crib. He bundled the kids up and sent them out to play in the snow.
3. To dress snugly in warm clothes or blankets: I bundled up and went outside.
See also: bundle, up

bundle

n. a large amount of money. (see also lose a bundle, make a bundle, package.) He still has a bundle from the sale of his house.

bundle of joy

and bundle from heaven
n. a baby. We are expecting a bundle of joy next September. Robert, your little bundle from heaven smells like a saddle bag from the other place.
See also: bundle, joy, of

bundle from heaven

verb
See also: bundle, heaven

bundle of nerves

n. a very nervous person. I’m just a bundle of nerves. I wish this were over.
See also: bundle, nerve, of

drop a bundle (on someone)

tv. to spend a lot of money pleasing or entertaining someone. I dropped a bundle on the candidate, and it didn’t help me at all.
See also: bundle, drop, on

drop a bundle

verb
See also: bundle, drop

drop a bundle (on something)

tv. to pay a lot of money for something. Pete dropped a bundle on this car.
See also: bundle, drop, on

drop a bundle

verb
See also: bundle, drop

lose a bundle

tv. to lose a lot of money. (see also bundle. Compare this with make a bundle.) Don lost a bundle on that land purchase.
See also: bundle, lose

make a bundle

and make a pile
tv. to make a lot of money. (see also bundle.) She made a bundle on a website investment. I want to buy a few stocks and make a pile in a few years.
See also: bundle, make

bundle of joy

A baby.
See also: bundle, joy, of

bundle of nerves

An extremely nervous person.
See also: bundle, nerve, of
References in classic literature ?
Death is the king's medicine," I answered, lifting the bundle, and laying it as far from him in the shadow of the fence as I dared.
Presently a cheering idea occurred to him: after so large a breakfast, Jacob would be sure to go to sleep in the cart; you see at once that David meant to seize his bundle, jump out, and be free.
When I saw him last, he took his cap off, took out the little bundle of old letters, hung his cap on the back of the chair--his coat was there already, for he had pulled that off before he went to put the shutters up--and I left him turning the letters over in his hand, standing just where that crumbled black thing is upon the floor.
Excuse me," said the red-nosed man to the young fellow with the bundle, rather suddenly; "whom have I the honour to be talking to?
So now they went on again and coming presently to a pond of muddy water they tied a heavy stone to the bundle of quills and sunk it to the bottom of the pond, to avoid carrying it farther.
He snatched up her bundle of blankets, and outside the cabin door his own as well.
So it was that old Til might well have quailed in her tattered sandals had she but even vaguely guessed the thoughts which passed in De Vac's mind; but the extra gold pieces he dropped into her withered palm as she delivered the bundle to him, together with the promise of more, quite effectually won her loyalty and her silence for the time being.
Taking the basket on one arm and the bundle on the other, he strode away towards the traitorous smell, looking as fierce as a lion, while Rose marched behind under her umbrella.
Once he was made to get out of the carriage, and slept through a night on a bench in a house of bricks with his bundle under his head; and once for many hours he had to sit on a floor of flat stones dozing, with his knees up and with his bundle between his feet.
a match might afford her a world of comfort, if she only dared take a single one out of the bundle, draw it against the wall, and warm her fingers by it.
At his request I next collected the other papers--that is to say, the bundle of letters, the unfinished book and the volumes of the Diary-- and enclosed them all in one wrapper, sealed with my own seal.
It was no sooner said but I stepped into the shop, and with my back to the wench, as if I had stood up for a cart that was going by, I put my hand behind me and took the bundle, and went off with it, the maid or the fellow not perceiving me, or any one else.
John Chivery, in his best clothes, with his tall hat under his arm, his ivory-handled cane genteelly embarrassing his deportment, and a bundle of cigars in his hand!
He had a crust of bread, a coarse shirt, and two pairs of stockings, in his bundle.
He then saw a slouching man of forbidding appearance standing in the midst of the school, with a bundle under his arm; and saw that it was Riderhood.