bugger off


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bugger off

Get out of here; go away; get lost. Primarily heard in UK, Australia, New Zealand. Listen, I don't want to buy any, so why don't you just bugger off and leave me alone!
See also: bugger, off

bugger off

v. Chiefly British Vulgar Slang
To go away. Used chiefly as a command.
See also: bugger, off
References in periodicals archive ?
We think that, on the whole, we have made a pretty good job of it, so we feel that we are entitled to feel a bit hacked off when people who have been absent for generations, suddenly reappear and tell us that the countryside belongs to them and we can all just bugger off and a well, just bugger off and take all our nasty habits with us, because they are going to take away our houses and frolic over our lands in a nice PC way.
And while I think most people generally wish them well, we also wish they'd bugger off and do it quietly.
If there are 30 kids and their parents bugger off, how will I keep control?
If a child is suffering serious illness but is seven or over they can bugger off.
If Charles and his lot can't be bothered to play the game they should all bugger off to Balmoral.
There's good prize-money at tracks like Clairefontaine, and he's a front-runner, so he may be able to bugger off in front, as they like to hold horses up in France and don't go too fast.
A second ad slams Sir Paul McCartney's wife reading, ``Oh and Heather Mills McCartney can bugger off too'' and states the estate costs ``less than the price of a Chelsea semi''.
It was a joke, a way that even in the most civilised drawing room, even in front of your rich Jewish banker host, that you could tell him to bugger off out of Germany.
After all, he cannot have foreseen that the man to whom he so benevolently gave another chance has spat his charity back in his face and wants to bugger off to Birmingham.
Bugger off and give us all a break" - Tony Blackburn on Tara.
As regards whether England should pay for Welsh water is not a new argument, when, during the 1950s, I was still a passionate Welshman, serving an apprenticeship in Birmingham, this was a regular discussion around the canteen table, until one morning a machinist who could not read his paper above the banter brought a bit of home truth into the discussion with this laconic statement, ``If all you Welsh were to bugger off back to Wales, we wouldn't want yer water.
I've always tried to take the stance that if you don't want to play for Villa then bugger off somewhere else.
I'd have told you all to bugger off within three minutes," he says.
The government's response seems to be: "You can't sleep here, you can't have housing benefit, so bugger off.
If I tried to interfere, I'd probably get told to bugger off and rightly so.