buckle

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make buckle and tongue meet

To have enough money to survive. Although the exact image referred to in this phrase is unclear, it means the same as "make ends meet." Now that I have a well-paying job, I can finally make buckle and tongue meet.
See also: and, buckle, make, meet, tongue

buckle down

1. To anchor or fasten something or someone in place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "buckle" and "down." Did you buckle the bikes down securely? Can you please buckle down the baby in her highchair?
2. To put forth maximum effort toward something, especially after not having done so. If you want to get a passing grade this semester, you'll really need to buckle down and study hard.
See also: buckle, down

buckle in

To anchor or fasten oneself or another in place with a seatbelt, as in a vehicle. A noun can be used between "buckle" and "in" or after "in." Can you buckle the baby in while I put our bags in the trunk? This car is not moving until everyone is buckled in!
See also: buckle

buckle under

1. To collapse or fall apart, as of a structure or object. In this usage, the cause of the collapse can be stated after "under" Three people sitting on the chair at the same time caused it to buckle under. That rickety old roof buckled under the weight of the snow.
2. To succumb to pressure or stress. In this usage, the cause of the collapse is usually stated after "under." Karen buckled under the stress of being student council president and resigned from her post.
See also: buckle

buckle up

1. To anchor or fasten something or someone in place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "buckle" and "up." Are the bikes securely buckled up? Can you please buckle the baby up in her highchair?
2. To anchor or fasten oneself or another in place with a seatbelt, as in a vehicle. A noun can be used between "buckle" and "up" or after "up." Can you buckle the baby up while I put our bags in the trunk? This car is not moving until everyone is buckled up!
3. To bend at the waist. She keeps buckling up and clutching her stomach, so the pain must be pretty bad—let's take her to the doctor.
4. slang Prepare for what is about to happen, such as danger, excitement, trouble, etc. The boss is in a terrible mood today, so buckle up! Buckle up, folks. This game is going down to the wire!
See also: buckle, up

buckle down (to something)

to settle down to something; to begin to work seriously at something. If you don't buckle down to your job, you'll be fired. You had better buckle down and get busy.
See also: buckle, down

buckle someone in

to attach someone securely with a vehicle's seat belts. (This includes airplane seat belts.) Don't forget to buckle the children in. Did you buckle in the children?
See also: buckle

buckle someone or something down

to attach someone or something down with straps that buckle together. They stopped to buckle the load down again. Did you buckle down the kids?
See also: buckle, down

buckle someone or something up

to attach someone or something securely with straps that buckle together. (This emphasizes the completeness and secureness of the act.) Buckle the children up before we leave. Buckle up your shoes.
See also: buckle, up

buckle under

 
1. Lit. [for something] to collapse. With heavy trucks on it, the bridge buckled under. The table buckled under.
2. Fig. [for someone] to collapse or give in under the burden of heavy demands or great anxiety. With so much to worry about, she buckled under. I was afraid she would buckle under.
See also: buckle

buckle under something

to collapse under or from the weight of something. The bridge buckled under the weight of the truck and collapsed. The table finally buckled under.
See also: buckle

buckle up

 and belt up
to buckle one's seat belt, as in a car or plane. Please buckle up so our flight can begin. I wish you would obey the law and belt up.
See also: buckle, up

knuckle down (to something)

Fig. to get busy doing something. I want you to knuckle down to your work and stop worrying about the past. Come on. Knuckle down. Get busy.
See also: down, knuckle

buckle down

to do the work you need to do Schools, parents, and students need to buckle down and find ways to reach the new standards.
See also: buckle, down

buckle up

to fasten a strap that holds you in your seat in a vehicle or aircraft Four out of five children are not correctly buckled up. The pilot asked the passengers to buckle up because we were flying through a storm system.
See also: buckle, up

knuckle down

to work hard You're going to have to knuckle down to improve your grades if you want to get into a good college. Volunteers really knuckled down and cleaned up the town after the storm.
See also: down, knuckle

buckle down

Set to work, apply oneself with determination, as in All right, we'll buckle down now and study for exams. Originating about 1700 as buckle to, the expression gained currency with the football song "Buckle-Down, Winsocki" (from the Broadway musical comedy Best Foot Forward, 1941). [Mid-1800s]
See also: buckle, down

buckle under

Give way, collapse owing to stress, as in One more heavy snowfall and the roof may buckle under, or She buckled under the strain of two jobs. [Late 1500s]
See also: buckle

buckle up

Fasten a seat belt, as in All the children must learn to buckle up as soon as they get in a car. This term came into wide use in the second half of the 1900s, when seat belts became mandatory automobile equipment. Earlier they had been used mainly in airplanes.
See also: buckle, up

knuckle down

1. Apply oneself seriously to some task or goal, as in The professor insisted that we knuckle down and get our papers in by Friday. Both this term and the rhyming synonym buckle down date from the 1860s, but the precise allusion in either is unclear.
2. See knuckle under.
See also: down, knuckle

buckle down

v.
1. To secure something or someone with straps that fasten together with buckles: Don't forget to buckle down the top of the suitcase before we pack it into the car. We took off our backpacks and buckled them down on the roof of the truck.
2. To apply oneself and start working seriously at something: I've wasted a lot of time, and now I have to buckle down and finish my homework.
See also: buckle, down

buckle under

v.
1. To bend, crumple or collapse under some great weight or pressure: The bridge supports were weakened by rust and buckled under the weight of the heavy truck. The metal chair I was sitting on suddenly buckled under, and I fell to the ground.
2. To succumb to or be adversely affected by some pressure: Some schools have buckled under the strain of having too many new students. I had fought very hard against their ideas but finally buckled under to them.
See also: buckle

buckle up

v.
1. To secure something or someone with straps that fasten together with buckles: Buckle up your shoes. We buckled the baby up in its car seat.
2. To fasten one's seat belt: The first thing I did when I got on the plane was to buckle up.
3. To bend or fold in half at the middle: Everyone buckled up with laughter when they heard my jokes.
See also: buckle, up

knuckle down

v.
To apply oneself earnestly to a task: We've been relaxing too long—it's time for us to knuckle down and finish this work.
See also: down, knuckle

knuckle down

verb
See also: down, knuckle

knuckle down

Apply yourself to the job at hand. The phrase comes from the game of marbles, one of the once-popular children's street games. Players shot their “shooter” marble by clenching the marble in a fist with knuckles touching the ground, then launching it with a flick of the thumb. When it was a player's turn and his attention was elsewhere, he was reminded, “Okay, knuckle down.” A similar phrase, “buckle down” most likely came from the idea of tightening your belt before performing an arduous task.
See also: down, knuckle
References in classic literature ?
A new hat for Saillard was a matter of deliberation; the time a coat could last was estimated and discussed; umbrellas were carefully hung up by means of a brass buckle.
And now, Sammy,' said the old gentleman, when the whip- lashes, and the buckles, and the samples, had been all put back, and the book once more deposited at the bottom of the same pocket, 'now, Sammy, I know a gen'l'm'n here, as'll do the rest o' the bisness for us, in no time--a limb o' the law, Sammy, as has got brains like the frogs, dispersed all over his body, and reachin' to the wery tips of his fingers; a friend of the Lord Chancellorship's, Sammy, who'd only have to tell him what he wanted, and he'd lock you up for life, if that wos all.
There were hundreds of things that he wanted to do, but the grown men laughed at him and said, "Wait till you have been in the buckle, Kotuko.
When the dog found a hole the boy would build himself a little, low snow wall to keep off the worst of the bitter wind, and there he would wait ten, twelve, twenty hours for the seal to come up to breathe, his eyes glued to the tiny mark he had made above the hole to guide the downward thrust of his harpoon, a little seal-skin mat under his feet, and his legs tied together in the tutareang (the buckle that the old hunters had talked about).
To all this Robin answered never a word, but, having softly felt around till he found the buckle of the belt that held the Friar's sword, he worked slyly at the fastenings, seeking to loosen them.
A richly wrought leathern girdle, studded with precious stones, and held in place by a huge carved buckle of gold, clasped the garment about her waist so that the upper portion fell outward over the girdle after the manner of a blouse.
Martin did not deign to reply to this sally, except by a grunt, as he buckled the last buckle of his climbing-irons, and Arthur looked reproachfully at East without speaking.
MyBuckleMate has been named a 2014 National Parenting Publications Awards (NAPPA) SILVER winner for its innovation, attention to quality and ingenious design that keeps floppy back seat buckles propped up so kids and adults with limited mobility can buckle up by themselves with just one hand.
FORMER postman Nick Buckles walked away from G4S in May - pocketing PS16million.
G4S's Olympics failure saw Mr Buckles hauled before MPs, during which he admitted it was a "humiliating shambles for the company".
Summary: Nick Buckles, the man in charge of beleaguered security firm G4S, insisted he was the right man to run the Olympics security contract.
With the death of Frank Buckles at age 110 a week ago, the United States has lost the last of the 4.
Frank Buckles is but one long life separated from the nation's founders.
BUCKLES Investment Services Ltd, the Rhyl-based independent financial adviser, has achieved success in the prestigious Financial Adviser Life and Pensions Awards 2009.
Instead, replace busted buckles with the MOLLE buckles set, NSN 8465-01-524-7639.