buckle

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Related to buckled: buckled down, buckled up

make buckle and tongue meet

To have enough money to survive. Although the exact image referred to in this phrase is unclear, it means the same as "make ends meet." Now that I have a well-paying job, I can finally make buckle and tongue meet.
See also: and, buckle, make, meet, tongue

buckle down (to something)

to settle down to something; to begin to work seriously at something. If you don't buckle down to your job, you'll be fired. You had better buckle down and get busy.
See also: buckle, down

buckle someone in

to attach someone securely with a vehicle's seat belts. (This includes airplane seat belts.) Don't forget to buckle the children in. Did you buckle in the children?
See also: buckle

buckle someone or something down

to attach someone or something down with straps that buckle together. They stopped to buckle the load down again. Did you buckle down the kids?
See also: buckle, down

buckle someone or something up

to attach someone or something securely with straps that buckle together. (This emphasizes the completeness and secureness of the act.) Buckle the children up before we leave. Buckle up your shoes.
See also: buckle, up

buckle under

 
1. Lit. [for something] to collapse. With heavy trucks on it, the bridge buckled under. The table buckled under.
2. Fig. [for someone] to collapse or give in under the burden of heavy demands or great anxiety. With so much to worry about, she buckled under. I was afraid she would buckle under.
See also: buckle

buckle under something

to collapse under or from the weight of something. The bridge buckled under the weight of the truck and collapsed. The table finally buckled under.
See also: buckle

buckle up

 and belt up
to buckle one's seat belt, as in a car or plane. Please buckle up so our flight can begin. I wish you would obey the law and belt up.
See also: buckle, up

knuckle down (to something)

Fig. to get busy doing something. I want you to knuckle down to your work and stop worrying about the past. Come on. Knuckle down. Get busy.
See also: down, knuckle

buckle down

to do the work you need to do Schools, parents, and students need to buckle down and find ways to reach the new standards.
See also: buckle, down

buckle up

to fasten a strap that holds you in your seat in a vehicle or aircraft Four out of five children are not correctly buckled up. The pilot asked the passengers to buckle up because we were flying through a storm system.
See also: buckle, up

knuckle down

to work hard You're going to have to knuckle down to improve your grades if you want to get into a good college. Volunteers really knuckled down and cleaned up the town after the storm.
See also: down, knuckle

buckle down

Set to work, apply oneself with determination, as in All right, we'll buckle down now and study for exams. Originating about 1700 as buckle to, the expression gained currency with the football song "Buckle-Down, Winsocki" (from the Broadway musical comedy Best Foot Forward, 1941). [Mid-1800s]
See also: buckle, down

buckle under

Give way, collapse owing to stress, as in One more heavy snowfall and the roof may buckle under, or She buckled under the strain of two jobs. [Late 1500s]
See also: buckle

buckle up

Fasten a seat belt, as in All the children must learn to buckle up as soon as they get in a car. This term came into wide use in the second half of the 1900s, when seat belts became mandatory automobile equipment. Earlier they had been used mainly in airplanes.
See also: buckle, up

knuckle down

1. Apply oneself seriously to some task or goal, as in The professor insisted that we knuckle down and get our papers in by Friday. Both this term and the rhyming synonym buckle down date from the 1860s, but the precise allusion in either is unclear.
2. See knuckle under.
See also: down, knuckle

buckle down

v.
1. To secure something or someone with straps that fasten together with buckles: Don't forget to buckle down the top of the suitcase before we pack it into the car. We took off our backpacks and buckled them down on the roof of the truck.
2. To apply oneself and start working seriously at something: I've wasted a lot of time, and now I have to buckle down and finish my homework.
See also: buckle, down

buckle under

v.
1. To bend, crumple or collapse under some great weight or pressure: The bridge supports were weakened by rust and buckled under the weight of the heavy truck. The metal chair I was sitting on suddenly buckled under, and I fell to the ground.
2. To succumb to or be adversely affected by some pressure: Some schools have buckled under the strain of having too many new students. I had fought very hard against their ideas but finally buckled under to them.
See also: buckle

buckle up

v.
1. To secure something or someone with straps that fasten together with buckles: Buckle up your shoes. We buckled the baby up in its car seat.
2. To fasten one's seat belt: The first thing I did when I got on the plane was to buckle up.
3. To bend or fold in half at the middle: Everyone buckled up with laughter when they heard my jokes.
See also: buckle, up

knuckle down

v.
To apply oneself earnestly to a task: We've been relaxing too long—it's time for us to knuckle down and finish this work.
See also: down, knuckle

knuckle down

verb
See also: down, knuckle

knuckle down

Apply yourself to the job at hand. The phrase comes from the game of marbles, one of the once-popular children's street games. Players shot their “shooter” marble by clenching the marble in a fist with knuckles touching the ground, then launching it with a flick of the thumb. When it was a player's turn and his attention was elsewhere, he was reminded, “Okay, knuckle down.” A similar phrase, “buckle down” most likely came from the idea of tightening your belt before performing an arduous task.
See also: down, knuckle
References in periodicals archive ?
Investigation also may yield clothing fibers and other subtle evidence on the belts that suggests they were buckled at the time of the crash.
When we walk up, we can see the child strapped into the seat but if you pull on the seat you can tell it's not even buckled in,'' Merrill said.
The child passenger law requires that anyone who weighs less than 40 pounds or is younger than 4 must be buckled into a child safety seat.
If we stop and cite you for a traffic offense, and you're not buckled up, you will get a ticket," said Colonel William Seck, Kansas Highway Patrol, and Colonel Roger D.
During the 2005 Click It or Ticket enforcement campaign, more than 250 police agencies in California issued approximately 155,000 seat belt citations to motorists and vehicle occupants who were not buckled up during a stepped-up effort that helped boost California's seat belt use rate.
If a driver is unbuckled, 70 percent of the time children riding in that vehicle won't be buckled either.
According to the Texas Transportation Institute, two out of three children between 5 and 9 years old routinely travel in Texas without being buckled up, putting them at risk of crash-related injuries or death.
We hope officers can expand the Mobilization's success and, once again, save lives with a clear message to America: The law requires that children be buckled up at all times.
We're very serious about making sure all drivers and passengers are buckled up," said Sunne Wright McPeak, Secretary of the California Business, Transportation & Housing Agency.
According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), when a driver is buckled, 94 percent of the time children in that vehicle are buckled; but, when a driver is unbuckled, only 30 percent of child passengers are buckled.
Make sure everybody else in the vehicle is buckled up as well, especially child passengers who belong in a safety seat, Helmick advised.
Each of us has the right to know -- when we buckle up, or when our children do -- that the buckle will stay buckled.
A survey recently completed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) found that 19 million more Americans buckled up in 1998.
Law enforcement in every state will be out in force during the week to make sure everyone, especially every child, is properly buckled up.