buck up


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buck up

To adopt a positive outlook, attitude, or mood when one is upset or discouraged. Although typically issued as an instruction, the phrase can also be used with a noun or pronoun between "buck" and "up." Buck up, honey—I'm sure the interview didn't go as badly as you think. I tried to buck up my daughter as she fretted over her test scores.
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buck up

to cheer up; to perk up. Come on, now, buck up. Things can't be all that bad. She began to buck up when I showed her the results of the tests.
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buck up (somebody)

also buck (somebody) up
to encourage someone to be energetic and positive I told the kids when they had colds to buck up and tough it out.
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buck up

Cheer up, become encouraged, as in Buck up! We'll soon have it done, or Even the promise of a vacation did not buck her up. This term was first recorded in 1844.
See also: buck, up

buck up

v.
1. To make one's self feel more heartened or ready to confront a problem: I eventually bucked up and started doing something about my financial problems.
2. To make someone feel more heartened or ready to confront a problem: Getting a good grade on the quiz bucked me up for the big test. The football team bucked up the crowd when they scored a touchdown.
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buck up

in. to cheer up; to perk up. Come on, now, buck up. Things can’t be all that bad.
See also: buck, up