bubble

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burst the bubble of (someone)

To upset or destroy someone's belief, conviction, or mood by delivering news that runs contrary to what he or she holds to be true. I hate to burst the bubble of everyone here, but this period of economic success will not last long.
See also: bubble, burst, of

pop (someone's) bubble

To disprove, ruin, or destroy someone's fantasy, delusion, or misbelief. A less common variant of "burst (someone's) bubble." Sorry to pop your bubble, Janet, but Sarah only went out on a date with you to make Suzie jealous. Sean took pleasure in popping the environmentalist's bubble, explaining to him that renewable energy devices cause huge environmental damage to produce.
See also: bubble, pop

pop the bubble of (someone)

To disprove, ruin, or destroy someone's fantasy, delusion, or misbelief. A less common variant of "burst the bubble of (someone)." The Supreme Court ruling is likely to pop the bubble of all the activitists who were in favor of overturning the case.
See also: bubble, of, pop

burst (one's) bubble

To bring someone back to reality, especially if they are dreaming or fantasizing about something unrealistic. Look, I hate to burst your bubble, but there is no way you're getting into Harvard! You're a C student!
See also: bubble, burst

bubble over

 
1. Lit. [for boiling or effervescent liquid] to spill or splatter over the edge of its container. The pot bubbled over and put out the flame on the stove. The stew bubbled over.
2. Fig. [for someone] to be so happy and merry that the joy "spills over" onto other people. She was just bubbling over, she was so happy. Lily bubbled over with joy.
See also: bubble

bubble up (through something)

[for a liquid] to seep up or well up through something, such as from between rocks, through a crack in the floor, or through a hole in the bottom of a boat. The water bubbled up through a crack in the basement floor.
See also: bubble, up

burst someone's bubble

Fig. to destroy someone's illusion or delusion; to destroy someone's fantasy. I hate to burst your bubble, but Columbus did not discover Canada. Even if you think I am being foolish, please don't burst my bubble.
See also: bubble, burst

half a bubble off plumb

Fig. giddy; crazy. She is acting about half a bubble off plumb. What is wrong with her? Tom is just half a bubble off plumb, but he is all heart.
See also: bubble, half, off, plumb

bubble up

to appear suddenly When she laughs, a happy child's laugh bubbles up out of her. The most interesting ideas in education have bubbled up in places as different as New York and Arizona.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of bubble up (to rise to the surface of a liquid)
See also: bubble, up

burst somebody's bubble

also burst the bubble of somebody
to tell someone unexpected bad news I don't want to burst her bubble by telling her we won't have a vacation this summer. He tries to burst the bubble of anyone who believes population growth is not a problem.
See also: bubble, burst

on the bubble

equally likely to experience either of two results The Cougars, who looked like they'd definitely be in the tournament a week ago, are suddenly a team on the bubble. Some states will vote for the Democrats, and some are likely to vote for the Republicans, but Arizona is on the bubble.
Related vocabulary: (live) on the edge
Etymology: based on the idea that something on the surface of a bubble is as likely to roll in one direction as in another
See also: bubble, on

the bubble bursts

a very happy or successful period of time suddenly ends (usually in past tenses) The economy was booming, then the bubble burst with the stockmarket crash of October 1987.
See also: bubble, burst

bubble over

v.
1. To rise and spill over the edges of a container while boiling or effervescing: Soup bubbled over from the hot pan. Better turn the heat down; your stew is bubbling over!
2. To be full of some emotion, to the point where one cannot resist expressing it: We were bubbling over with excitement at the good news.
See also: bubble

bubble up

v.
1. To rise due to a bubbling motion: Water bubbled up through the hole in the boat. Foam always bubbles up onto the counter when I wash the dishes.
2. To rise or increase steadily in intensity: Anger bubbled up in his chest when he heard their crude remarks.
3. To express some positive emotion: She bubbled up with joy when she got accepted into college.
See also: bubble, up

bubble water

and bubbles
n. champagne. More bubble water, or do you want something stronger? I just love the way bubbles tickles my little old nose.
See also: bubble, water

bubbles

verb
See also: bubble

half a bubble off plumb

phr. giddy; crazy. Tom is just half a bubble off plumb, but he is all heart.
See also: bubble, half, off, plumb

on the bubble

On the brink of a new development or condition, especially in danger of being cut from a sports team: "These are the players on the bubble, the ones who are not sure if they have made the team" (Jason Diamos).
See also: bubble, on
References in periodicals archive ?
For a 2 mm diameter stainless-steel orifice, it can be seen from Figure 5a that the bubble formation belongs to period-1 bubbling up to a gas flow rate of about 330 [cm.
It should be noted that the bubble formation period decreases (and the corresponding bubble formation frequency increases) with increase in gas flow rate until a point at which period-1 bubbling changes to period-2 bubbling.
As the diameter of the orifice increased (Figures 6 and 7), the effect of surface characteristics on the bubble formation time in the period-1 bubbling regime decreased and almost vanished for the case of a 6 mm orifice (see period-1 bubbling regime in Figure 7).
In the case of the period-2 bubbling regime, as indicated by Figures 5, 6 and 7, the bubble formation periods are always larger for Teflon and acrylic orifices than for a stainless-steel orifice.
As seen from Figure 5a, it should be noted, however, that the transition from period-1 to period-2 bubbling occurs at smaller flow rates for Teflon and acrylic orifices than for a stainless-steel orifice.
in period-2 bubbling regime and chaotic bubbling regime, the effect of orifice diameter on bubble formation periods is not significant.
However, as seen from Figures 5, 6 and 7, the bubbling behaviour and its transition were found to be sensitive to the orifice diameter.
For the period-1 bubbling regime, it can be clearly seen from Figure 9 that the bubble formation period (and therefore bubble volume) decreases with decrease in surface tension (up to [Q.
Interestingly, the critical gas velocity (or flow rate), at which regime transition from period-1 to period-2 bubbling occurred was found to decrease with decrease in surface tension.
The transition between various bubbling regimes can be represented by bubble formation regime maps constructed using appropriate dimensionless numbers.
For Teflon and acrylic orifices, the features of transition from period-1 to period-2 bubbling were not significantly affected by surface characteristics of the orifice material (see Figures 11 and 12).
Depending on the magnitude of the gas flow rate, different bubbling behaviour, namely period-1, period-2 (with pairing or with coalescence at the orifice) and chaotic bubbling, were observed.
The critical orifice gas velocity or flow rate (at which the regime transition from period-1 to period-2 bubbling and from period-2 to chaotic bubbling takes place) decreased with increase in the diameter of the orifice.
As the contact angle increased, it was observed rather qualitatively that the critical gas velocity at which transition from period-1 to period-2 bubbling occurs decreases.
As the surface tension decreases, the bubble formation time or volume decreased in period-1 bubbling where as no significant influence was observed in period-2 bubbling regime.