broom

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broom closet

The figurative place where one hides one's practice of Wicca or other Pagan religious beliefs or activities from other people, likened to a homosexual person being "in the closet" when he or she has not publicly revealed his or her sexual orientation. "Broom" is a reference to the stereotypical accessory of witches. I had been studying the intricacies of real witchcraft for several years before I came out of the broom closet to my parents.
See also: broom, closet

all mops and brooms

Drunk. Likely a reference to the mops and brooms needed to clean up after drunk people who vomit. I can't stand coming to this bar—it's full of college kids who are all mops and brooms for the first time. I got all mops and brooms at the party last night, and I'm paying for it today, all right. I may never drink again!
See also: all, and, broom, mop

new broom

A new manager (of a company or organization) who has been hired specifically to make changes and improvements. After two years of falling profits, a new broom was hired to make budget cuts and improve the corporate culture.
See also: broom, new

New brooms sweep clean.

 and A new broom sweeps clean.
Prov. Someone who is new in a particular job will do a very good job at first, to prove how competent he or she is. Jill: That new supervisor is awfully strict. Jane: New brooms sweep clean. The new teacher immediately flunked three of the laziest students. "A new broom sweeps clean," one of the students shrugged.
See also: broom, clean, new, sweep

a new broom

a new leader of an organization who makes a lot of changes and improvements There was a feeling that White had been in charge long enough and that what was needed was a new broom.
See also: broom, new

new broom sweeps clean, a

A fresh leader or administration gets rid of the old and brings in new ideas and personnel. For example, Once he takes office, you can be sure the President will replace most of the people on the staff-a new broom sweeps clean . This term was already in John Heywood's 1546 proverb collection, was used figuratively by Shakespeare, and exists in many other languages as well.
See also: broom, new, sweep