bring around

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bring around

1. To cause one to regain consciousness. After Lily fainted, we used smelling salts to bring her around. We were finally able to bring around the patient who'd been knocked out.
2. To move something to a specific location. In this usage, a noun can be used between "bring" and "around." If you bring your shopping cart around the display, sir, I'll put it back for you. You need to bring around your car to the garage so the mechanic can take a look at it.
3. To take another person to a specific location or gathering. In this usage, a noun can be used between "bring" and "around." You should bring your sister around more often—she's hilarious.
4. To prompt one to change their opinion or view on something. In this usage, a person's name or pronoun can be used between "bring" and "around." I've found that political debates at dinner parties rarely bring someone around to a different point of view. Her passionate speech about the environment really brought me around to the importance of conservation efforts.
5. To walk around and deliver something, typically to people in an assembled group. Volunteers will bring around pamphlets to anyone who wants to sign up for the program today. You better get back to your seat—they've begun bringing around the first course.
See also: around, bring

bring someone around

 
1. Lit. to bring someone for a visit; to bring someone for someone (else) to meet. Please bring your wife around sometime. I'd love to meet her. You've just got to bring around your doctor friend for dinner.
2. and bring someone around (to consciousness) Fig. to bring someone to consciousness. The doctor brought around the unconscious man with smelling salts. The boxer was knocked out, but his manager brought him around.
3. and bring someone around (to one's way of thinking bring); someone around (to one's position) Fig. to persuade someone (to accept something); to manage to get someone to agree (to something). The last debate brought around a lot of voters to our candidate. I knew I could bring her around if I just had enough time to talk to her.
See also: around, bring

bring something around

 (to someone or something)
1. to move something, such as a vehicle, from one place to another, especially so it can be used. Would you kindly have James bring the car around? Tony will bring around the car to us.
2. to distribute something to someone or a group. (Said by a person who intends to receive what is brought.) Please bring the snacks around to us. Carl is bringing around the snacks to us.
See also: around, bring

bring around

Also, bring round.
1. Conduct someone or convey something to others. For example, Anne brought around the new intern to meet the nursing staff, or The clerk will bring round the papers for you to sign. [Late 1800s]
2. Also, bring to. Restore to health or consciousness. For example, Some fresh air will help bring him to. [First half of 1800s]
3. Convert or persuade someone, as in The senator was sure he could bring around the other committee members. [Mid-1800s]
See also: around, bring

bring around

or bring round
v.
1. To move or lead something or someone to a particular place: Please bring the car around to the front of the building. You should bring your kids around to play with our kids sometime.
2. To distribute something among a group: The servers will be bringing around refreshments shortly. If you're all hungry, I can bring some sandwiches around.
3. To direct some conversation toward a particular subject: At the meeting, I tried to bring the discussion around to our biggest problems, but no one wanted to talk about them.
4. To persuade someone to adopt a particular point of view or to do something: The employees tried to bring around their boss to their way of approaching the problem. He was reluctant to come with her, but she brought him around.
5. To cause someone to recover consciousness: I had passed out, but the fresh air brought me around.
See also: around, bring
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