bring (someone or oneself) to (do something)

(redirected from bring one to)

bring (someone or oneself) to (do something)

1. To cause or inspire one to take a particular action. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used after "bring." A desire to help my community brought me to volunteer at the local soup kitchen. Your mother and I just cannot fathom what would bring you to disrespect us like that.
2. To muster the courage or resolve to do something, typically something unpleasant or frightening. In this usage, a reflexive pronoun is used after "bring." I'm sorry, I just can't bring myself to eat snails.
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bring someone to

to help someone return to consciousness. We worked to bring him to before he went into shock. He was finally brought to by the smelling salts.
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bring to

1. Restore to consciousness, as in I'll see if these smelling salts will bring her to. Also see bring around, def. 2.
2. Cause a vessel to stop by heading into the wind or some other means. For example, As they neared the anchorage, they brought the boat to. This usage was first recorded in 1753.
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bring to

v.
1. To cause a ship to turn toward the wind or come to a stop: Some lines were dragging overboard, so we brought the ship to and hauled them in again.
2. To cause someone to recover consciousness: I fainted, but the smelling salts brought me to right away.
See also: bring