brief

(redirected from briefer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to briefer: onwards

brief (someone) about (someone or something)

To tell someone key information about someone or something, often an issue or situation. Please brief me about the candidate that I'll be interviewing this afternoon. Someone needs to brief the CEO about the investigation before he speaks to the media.
See also: brief

in brief

In summary; to say it briefly. The film was, in brief, dull. If you can, please explain it in brief.
See also: brief

hold no brief for (someone or something)

To be unable or unwilling to tolerate or support someone or something. The senators has stated numerous times that he holds no brief for the "rights" of big corporations. The boss holds no brief for slackers.
See also: brief, hold, no

in snatches

In or for brief periods of time. I caught the speech in snatches, but the kids were screaming in the other room so I couldn't hear the TV properly. I only slept in snatches. I was too anxious about how to pay for the car repairs to sleep properly.
See also: snatch

brief someone about someone or something

 and brief someone on someone or something
to tell someone a summary with the essential details about someone or something. We need to brief the president about the latest event. I have to brief Michael on the new procedures at work.
See also: brief

hold no brief for someone or something

not to tolerate someone or something; to be opposed to someone or something. I hold no brief for Wally and his friends. Rachel holds no brief for that kind of thing.
See also: brief, hold, no

in brief

briefly; concisely. The whole story, in brief, is that Bob failed algebra because he did not study. Please tell me in brief why you want this job.
See also: brief

hold no brief for

Refuse to support, dislike, as in I hold no brief for liars. This term is a negative version of the legal expression hold a brief for, meaning "to support or defend a position by argument." The noun brief has been used in this way since the 1200s.
See also: brief, hold, no

in brief

Also, in short; in a word. Concisely, in few words, to sum up. All three phrases usually precede or follow a summary statement, as in In brief, we didn't get much out of his speech, or There was no agenda; in short, they could discuss whatever they wanted to, or The sun was shining, the sky was clear-in a word, it was a beautiful day. The first expression dates from the early 1400s; in short dates from the 1300s but the present usage dates from the 1700s; the hyperbolic in a word (since there is nearly always more than one word) dates from the late 1500s.
See also: brief

hold no brief for something

BRITISH, FORMAL
If you hold no brief for a person, organization, activity or belief, you do not support them or respect them. This newspaper holds no special brief for a committee that has done nothing to distinguish itself in the past. He holds no brief for formal education. Note: In law, a brief is all the papers relating to a particular client's case that are collected by the client's solicitor and given to the barrister who will represent them in court.
See also: brief, hold, no, something

in brief

COMMON If someone says or writes something in brief, they use as few words as possible and do not give many details. This in brief is how I see the situation at the moment. The disease is discussed in brief here.
See also: brief

hold no brief for

not support or argue in favour of.
The brief referred to is the summary of the facts and legal points in a case given to a barrister to argue in court.
See also: brief, hold, no

hold no ˈbrief for somebody/something

(formal) not be in favour of or not support somebody/something, for example a cause, an idea, etc: I hold no brief for long prison sentences but this terrible crime really deserves one.
Brief in this expression is the summary of facts and legal points in a case that is given to a lawyer to argue in a court. If a lawyer ‘holds no brief for’ a person, company, etc. this is not one of their clients/cases.

in ˈbrief

in a few words: I won’t give a you a long history of the dispute; in brief, it led to the business closing.And now, the news in brief.
See also: brief

in ˈsnatches

for short periods rather than continuously: Sleep came to him in brief snatches. OPPOSITE: at a stretch
See also: snatch

in brief

In short.
See also: brief
References in periodicals archive ?
The book's many adages, while thought provoking, would have been more accessible and possibly had more impact if they'd been made briefer and crisper.
New Internationalist also carries briefer articles on China's place in the world and the reach of the media in that country (pointing out that it is the biggest advertising market in the world with around 2,200 TV channels alone).
Costumes by Mary Jane Marcasiano began with lime, gold, and aqua tank tops over white cargo pants and grew increasingly briefer and more colorful, ending in bikini bathing suits that displayed the dancers' gorgeous muscularity and rich skin tones.
The UK-based marketing team will be using the twice-yearly Market Briefer to update the trade on a range of Dutch data, from slaughter number to price trends and export levels.
The only partial duplication is the music from The Merry Widow, with Boskovsky giving us a briefer synopsis and Jurowski the longer, more complete overture.
Mr Bell will use the hotseat to suggest it is time to implement a more frequent, sharply focused and briefer model of inspection.
The purpose of the online petition is two-fold: to generate more signatures statewide in a briefer time period, before our funding runs out, and to set up a central repository for all petitions collected statewide.
The article recounts the stories of these schools and concludes with several briefer examples that show how communities have found creative solutions to common problems encountered during historic renovation.
For a brief period at the very end of the Soviet era, a dozen years ago, Moscow's public debates were dominated by fresh discoveries about the darkest aspects of the Soviet era and by loud cries of "never again" For an even briefer moment, it seemed as though these revelations had terminally discredited both the individuals (Stalin, Beria, and the likes of Nikishov) and the institutions (such as the Communist Party and the secret police) which had practiced repression on such a titanic scale.
The appointing authority must coordinate the appointment of a briefer, who is most often the deceased soldier's colonel or brigade-level commander.
But it also means he has joined an ever-growing club: British CEOs with tenures even shorter than those in the United States and considerably briefer than in some other European countries.
I am not expecting honourable members to be able to do that, but I hope that they can be much briefer.