breeze

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bat the breeze

To chat or converse aimlessly or casually, without any serious topic of conversation. Customers always want to bat the breeze with me in the store before they buy something. I just batted the breeze with John for a while when he passed me on the street.
See also: bat, breeze

in a breeze

Easily; handily; without much or any effort. Enjoying the benefit of a week off between games, the home team won this match in a breeze.
See also: breeze

breeze along

Fig. to travel along casually, rapidly, and happily; to go through life in a casual and carefree manner. Kristine was just breezing along the road when she ran off onto the shoulder. We just breezed along the highway, barely paying attention to what we were doing. Don't just breeze along through life!
See also: breeze

breeze away

to leave quickly or abruptly. She said nothing more. She just breezed away. I breezed away without stopping to say good-bye.
See also: away, breeze

breeze in

(from some place) Go to sweep in (from some place).
See also: breeze

breeze in (to some place)

to enter a place quickly, in a happy and carefree manner. She breezed into the conference room and sat down at the head of the table. Jerry breezed in and said hello.
See also: breeze

breeze off

to leave quickly or abruptly. Don't just breeze off! Stay and talk. Lily breezed off in a huffy manner.
See also: breeze, off

breeze out (of some place)

to leave a place quickly. She was here for a moment and then suddenly breezed out. She breezed out of the room in an instant.
See also: breeze, out

breeze through

 (something)
1. Fig. to complete some task rapidly and easily. I breezed through my calculus assignment in no time at all. It was not hard. I just breezed through.
2. Fig. to travel through a place rapidly. They breezed through every little town without stopping. We didn't stop. We just breezed through.
See also: breeze

fan the breeze

Fig. to chat or gossip. We're just fanning the breeze, so you didn't interrupt anything. Stop fanning the breeze and get to work.
See also: breeze, fan

hands down

easily; unquestionably. She won the contest hands down. They declared her the winner hands down.
See also: down, hand

shoot the breeze

Fig. to chat casually and without purpose. We spent the entire afternoon just shooting the breeze. It was good to shoot the breeze with you, Mary.
See also: breeze, shoot

breeze through something

to do something easily or quickly Lisa breezed through her homework, then started practicing for the play.
See also: breeze

breeze through somewhere

to move through a place quickly Folks living close to the border could breeze through customs in those days.
See also: breeze

shoot the breeze

to have a relaxed conversation Hank and his pals spend a lot of time drinking beer, shooting the breeze, and thinking about girls.
See also: breeze, shoot

hands down

very easily The last time we played tennis he beat me hands down. That leader is hands down the biggest threat to peace in the region.
Usage notes: often used in the form win something hands down: If there were an award for bad luck, you'd win it hands down.
Related vocabulary: hand down something
See also: down, hand

shoot the breeze/bull

  (American informal)
to talk in a relaxed way about things that are not important We sat out on the porch until late, just shooting the breeze.
See also: breeze, shoot

win (something) hands down

to win easily She won the debate hands down.
See also: down, hand, win

breeze in

1. Arrive in a casual way, as in She breezed in, two hours late. This phrase transfers the blowing of a light wind to human entrances. [Colloquial; c. 1900]
2. Win easily, as in A fine golfer, he breezed in first. This usage at first alluded to horse racing but soon was transferred to more general use. [c. 1900]
See also: breeze

hands down

1. Also, in a breeze; in a walk. Easily, without effort, as in She won the election hands down, or They won in a breeze, 10-0, or The top players get through the first rounds of the tournament in a walk. All of these expressions originated in sports. Hands down, dating from the mid-1800s, comes from horse racing, where jockeys drop their hands downward and relax their hold when they are sure to win. In a breeze, first recorded in a baseball magazine in 1910, alludes to the rapid and easy passage of moving air; in a walk, also from baseball, alludes to taking a base on balls, that is, reaching first base without having hit a pitched ball because of the pitcher's mistakes.
2. Unquestionably, without a doubt, as in Hands down, it was the best thing I've ever done.
See also: down, hand

in a breeze

see under hands down.
See also: breeze

shoot the breeze

Also, shoot or throw the bull . Talk idly, chat, as in They've been sitting on the porch for hours, just shooting the breeze, or The guys sit around the locker room, throwing the bull. The first of these slangy terms, alluding to talking into the wind, was first recorded in 1919. In the variant, first recorded in 1908, bull is a shortening of bullshit, and means "empty talk" or "lies."
See also: breeze, shoot

win hands down

Also, win in a walk or breeze . See under hands down.
See also: down, hand, win

breeze through

v.
1. To pass through some place swiftly and without lingering: The couple breezed through the room before anyone could say hello to them.
2. To make progress with something swiftly and effortlessly: The smart student breezed through the test.
See also: breeze

breeze

n. an easy task. Nothing to it. It was a breeze.

fan the breeze

tv. to chat or gossip. We’re just fanning the breeze, so you didn’t interrupt anything.
See also: breeze, fan

hands down

mod. easily; unquestionably. She won the contest hands down.
See also: down, hand

shoot the breeze

tv. to chat casually and without purpose. We spent the entire afternoon just shooting the breeze.
See also: breeze, shoot

hands down

1. With no trouble; easily.
2. Indisputably; unquestionably.
See also: down, hand

shoot the breeze

/bull Slang
To spend time talking in an idle manner; talk idly.
See also: breeze, shoot
References in classic literature ?
The faint, steady breeze was loaded with dew; and the wet, darkened sails held all there was of propelling power in it.
Here is the breeze, this time," he exclaimed, "and no mistake
It seemed to me that a stronger breeze would have blown away the contamination which clung to the ship.
The sun was low in the west and the breeze was soft and warm.
It showed Pearl in an unwonted aspect Heretofore, the mother, while loving her child with the intensity of a sole affection, had schooled herself to hope for little other return than the waywardness of an April breeze, which spends its time in airy sport, and has its gusts of inexplicable passion, and is petulant in its best of moods, and chills oftener than caresses you, when you take it to your bosom; in requital of which misdemeanours it will sometimes, of its own vague purpose, kiss your cheek with a kind of doubtful tenderness, and play gently with your hair, and then be gone about its other idle business, leaving a dreamy pleasure at your heart.
The cold evening breeze, of which I have spoken, whistled through every chink of the rude building and sprinkled the floor with a continual rain of fine sand.
Then he went and wakened the sailors, and bade them hoist the sails, for a breeze had sprung up and was blowing straight towards the harbour.
It was an invigorating sea breeze, charged with iodine.
A brisk breeze arose about ten o'clock; but, though it might have been prudent to take in a reef, the pilot, after carefully examining the heavens, let the craft remain rigged as before.
The morning breeze blew very pleasantly through the unglazed window, and that and the food contributed to the sense of animal comfort which I experienced.
A wind that rises in the daytime lasts long, but a night breeze soon falls.
Before them went the priest, reading the burial service, while the leaves of his book were rustling in the breeze.
The following day still saw them scattered within sight of each other and heading different ways; but when, at last, the breeze came with the darkling ripple that ran very blue on a pale sea, they all went in the same direction together.
but the others declare It was only a breeze that went by.
The breeze was laden still with the pleasant odours of the land.