bred


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Related to bred: Born and Bred

bred in the bone

1. (hyphenated if used as a modifier) Deeply and firmly rooted, ingrained, or established. His bred-in-the-bone etiquette came as a result of his years of military training. In this part of the country, hospitality is simply bred in the bone.
2. (hyphenated if used as a modifier) Long-standing and habitual, especially of ideology or religion. Most people vote according to their bred-in-the-bone political identification, rather than making individual assessments of different candidates. A lot of times, religious views are simply bred in the bone.
See also: bone, bred

born and bred

Born and raised in a particular place, which has shaped one's personality. As you could probably tell by his aggressive driving, he's a New Yorker, born and bred.
See also: and, born, bred

born and raised

Both born and raised in the same particular place; having lived in one's birthplace through one's adolescence. The phrase implies that one's identity has been shaped by the place. I may live in California now, but I'm a Texas gal, born and raised!
See also: and, born, raised

breed up a storm

Of the weather, to become overcast. I wouldn't go outside right now—it looks to be breeding up a storm.
See also: breed, storm, up

born and raised

 and born and bred
born and nurtured through childhood, usually in a specific place. She was born and raised in a small town in western Montana. Freddy was born and bred on a farm and had no love for city life.
See also: and, born, raised

born and bred

Born and educated in a single locale or social class. For example, Adam was a Bostonian, born and bred. Although the two words were paired earlier, the precise locution dates from the mid-1800s.
See also: and, born, bred

born and bred

by birth and upbringing.
1991 Sharon Kay Penman The Reckoning I was being tended by a most unlikely nurse, an Irish sprite who spoke French as if she was Paris born and bred.
See also: and, born, bred

ˌborn and ˈbred

born and brought up (in a place): He’s Liverpool born and bred.Both my parents were born and bred in London.
See also: and, born, bred

breed up a storm

New England
To become cloudy.
See also: breed, storm, up
References in periodicals archive ?
Lord Tweedmouth of Scotland, a wealthy noble who kept meticulous records, for instance, bred the golden retriever.
In 1868 and 1871, the pup was bred to a Tweed water spaniel, a now-extinct breed that was popular in that era.
Goldens became too popular, too quickly, and their sporting potential was diluted as American's eagerly bred them as mere pets.
Claire Bonnerot, Card Manager at BRED Banque Populaire said BRED is pleased with the results of Phase I of the project.
GFG Group's Miguel Warren, Vice President Sales, Asia, added : 'Our relationship with BRED I.
Cattle have been bred for these traits, thinking these animals would be most profitable.
Originally bred as dual purpose (meat and milk), tile cows are highly fertile and raise growthy calves.
These small cattle originated in southern Ireland in the 1800s, bred by farmers with small holdings in the mountains.
By implementing the Citrix Portlet for IBM WebSphere Portal, BRED is able to deliver all applications through a single user interface.
Our challenge was to cost-effectively upgrade our infrastructure to meet the changing dynamics of how our customers bank and how our employees work," said Jean-Pierre Fugairon, CIO of BRED.
The BRED solution features Citrix Presentation Server, IBM WebSphere Application Server Network Deployment, IBM WebSphere Portal Enable Version 5.
Still, the basic dog lurks in the gene pool of today's highly bred pet, as compelling to people in postmodern times as it was in the Pleistocene.
ALBC has reported Texas Longhorn cattle being bred with Devon (beef type) producing Texons.
These dogs have been bred in the United States since about 1890.