References in classic literature ?
Jo's breath gave out here, and wrapping her head in the paper, she bedewed her little story with a few natural tears, for to be independent and earn the praise of those she loved were the dearest wishes of her heart, and this seemed to be the first step toward that happy end.
This old house, for example, which sometimes has positively oppressed my breath with its smell of decaying timber
In those cases I always stopped and held my breath till I was sure Harris had not awakened--then I crept along again.
Omer, taking up his glass, 'because it's considered softening to the passages, by which this troublesome breath of mine gets into action.
And, ere I knew, I was bending over her, and as her sweet breath came and went I whispered: "Grace o' God, I am here.
You would have chuckled one moment and caught your breath the next, to see those two stout fellows swinging their sticks--each half as long again as the men were, and thick as their arm--and edging along sidewise, neither wishing to strike the first blow.
Swathed about his forehead, and hanging down over his face, so low as to be shaken by his breath, Mr.
The great Admiral and good seaman could read aright the signs of sea and sky, as his order to prepare to anchor at the end of the day sufficiently proves; but, all the same, the mere idea of these baffling easterly airs, coming on at any time within half an hour or so, after the firing of the first shot, is enough to take one's breath away, with the image of the rearmost ships of both divisions falling off, unmanageable, broadside on to the westerly swell, and of two British Admirals in desperate jeopardy.
Angry as he was at the whole breed and community of Man, something jumped up in his throat and made him catch his breath when he looked at the village roofs.
Occasionally a breath of Nature, a raindrop of pathos and tenderness, or a gleam of humor, will find its way into the midst of his fantastic imagery, and make us feel as if, after all, we were yet within the limits of our native earth.
I wrapp'd myself in grandeur then, And donn'd a visionary crown -- Yet it was not that Fantasy Had thrown her mantle over me - But that, among the rabble - men, Lion ambition is chain'd down - And crouches to a keeper's hand - Not so in deserts where the grand The wild - the terrible conspire With their own breath to fan his fire.
answered the Saw-Horse, gruffly, and dashed away so suddenly that Tip had to gasp for breath and hold firmly to the post he had driven into the creature's neck.
Again Nikita went stumbling through the snow, again he fell in, again climbed out and trudged about, and at last quite out of breath he sat down beside the sledge.
Not of old had he known shortness of breath such as this, and muscles that so easily tired at a stiff climb.
He paused under a lamp- post and breathed a low breath of surprise.