breathe

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breathe freely

To relax. To be free from worry. I can finally breathe freely now that I'm done my term paper—I had been working on that thing all day every day for weeks!
See also: breathe, freely

breathe easily

To relax. To be free from worry. I can finally breathe easily now that I'm done my term paper—I had been working on that thing all day every day for weeks!
See also: breathe, easily

as I live and breathe

Wow! An expression of surprise or amazement. As I live and breathe! I haven't seen you in years!
See also: and, breathe, live

able to breathe again

1. Literally, capable of inhaling and exhaling without difficulty. Once the climbers returned from the top of the mountain, they felt like they were finally able to breathe again.
2. Figuratively, recuperating from a busy or stressful period of time. After a long, hectic summer, many parents feel like they are able to breathe again once their kids are back in school.
See also: able, again, breathe

able to breathe (easily) again

 and able to breathe (freely) again 
1. Lit. able to breathe clean, fresh air with no restriction or obstruction. After I got out of the dank basement, I was able to breathe easily again.
2. Fig. able to relax and recover from a busy or stressful time; able to catch one's breath. (Able to can be replaced with can.) Final exams are over, so I can breathe easily again.
See also: able, again, breathe

As I live and breathe!

Fig. How amazing! (Said on seeing or experiencing something surprising.) As I live and breathe, here we are again! Well, as I live and breathe, it's Harry Smith!
See also: and, live

breathe a sigh of relief

 
1. Lit. to sigh in a way that signals one's relief that something has come to an end. At the end of the contest, we all breathed a sigh of relief.
2. Fig. to express relief that something has ended. With the contract finally signed, we breathed a sigh of relief as we drank a toast in celebration.
See also: breathe, of, relief, sigh

breathe down someone's neck

 
1. Fig. to keep close watch on someone; to watch someone's activities intently. (Alludes to someone standing very close behind a person.) I can't work with you breathing down my neck all the time. Go away. I will get through my life without your help. Stop breathing down my neck.
2. Fig. [for someone or something] to represent an approaching deadline. The project deadline is breathing down my neck. The due date for this paper is breathing down my neck.
See also: breathe, down, neck

breathe easy

to assume a relaxed state after a stressful period. After this crisis is over, I'll be able to breathe easy again. He won't be able to breathe easy until he pays off his debts.
See also: breathe, easy

breathe in

to inhale; to take air into the lungs. Now, relax and breathe in. Breathe out. Breathe in deeply; enjoy the summer air.
See also: breathe

breathe into something

to exhale into something; to expel one's breath into something. I was told to breathe into a tube that was connected to a machine of some type.
See also: breathe

breathe one's last

Euph. to die. She breathed her last at about two o'clock that afternoon. Cradled in his wife's arms, he breathed his last.
See also: breathe, last

breathe out

to exhale. Now, breathe out, then breathe in. The doctor told me to breathe out slowly.
See also: breathe, out

breathe something in

to take something into the lungs, such as air, medicinal vapors, gas, etc. Breathe the vapor in slowly. It will help your cold. Breathe in that fresh air!
See also: breathe

breathe something into something

to revive something; to introduce something new or positive into a situation. Her positive attitude breathed new life into the company. The project breathed a new spirit into the firm.
See also: breathe

breathe something (of something) (to someone)

to tell something to someone. (Usually in the negative.) Don't breathe a word of this to anyone! I won't breathe a word!

breathe something out

to exhale something. At last, he breathed his last breath out, and that was the end. Breathe out your breath slowly.
See also: breathe, out

breathe (up)on someone or something

to exhale on someone or something. (Upon is more formal and less commonly used than on.) Please don't breathe upon the food. Don't breathe on me!
See also: breathe, on

hardly have time to breathe

 and scarcely have time to breathe
Fig. to be very busy. This was such a busy day. I hardly had time to breathe. They made him work so hard that he scarcely had time to breathe.
See also: breathe, hardly, have, time

I don't have time to catch my breath,

 and I don't have time to breathe.
Fig. I am very busy.; I have been very busy. Henry: I'm so busy these days. I don't have time to catch my breath. Rachel: Oh, I know what you mean. Sue: Would you mind finishing this for me? Bill: Sorry, Sue. I'm busy. I don't have time to breathe.
See also: breath, catch, have, time

(I) won't breathe a word (of it).

 and (I) won't tell a Soul.
Fig. I will not tell anyone your secret. Bill: Don't tell anybody, but Sally is getting married. Mary: I won't breathe a word of it. Alice: The Jacksons are going to have to sell their house. Don't spread it around. Mary: I won't tell a soul.
See also: breathe, word

not breathe a word (about someone or something)

 and not breathe a word of it
Fig. to keep a secret about someone or something. Don't worry. I won't breathe a word about this matter. Please don't breathe a word about Bob and his problems. Don't worry. I won't breathe a word of it.
See also: breathe, not, word

breathe easy

to relax Baseball fans can breathe easy now that the players' strike is over.
See also: breathe, easy

breathe your last

(slightly formal)
to die Jay made the trip north to be with his mother when she breathed her last.
Usage notes: also used to describe the end of a organization, belief, or relationship: Amtrak may shortly breathe its last - without more funding, it may have to shut down next month.
See also: breathe, last

breathe (new) life into something

to bring ideas and energy to something Changes in the performance have breathed new life into a show that seemed ready to close. He has promised to breathe new life into the organization.
See also: breathe, life

live and breathe something

to be extremely interested in something I found it hard to discuss the poems, since I did not live and breathe poetry like many of my classmates did.
See also: and, breathe, live

breathe down your neck

to watch too closely what you do The supervisor breathes down my neck all the time, trying to make sure I'm working hard enough.
See also: breathe, down, neck

breathe a sigh of relief

to feel comfortable again after worrying about something Coastal residents breathed a sigh of relief when the hurricane was downgraded to a tropical storm. Her children breathed a quiet sigh of relief when she made arrangements to get help.
See also: breathe, of, relief, sigh

breathe a word

to tell a secret If you breathe a word of this to anyone, the whole deal will fall apart.
Usage notes: often used in the form not breathe a word: We were warned not to breathe a word about the party.
See also: breathe, word

breathe down somebody's neck

to pay very close attention to what someone does in a way that annoys or worries them It's awful having to work with a boss who's breathing down your neck the whole time.
See also: breathe, down, neck

breathe fire

to be very angry about something (sometimes + over ) The bishop was breathing fire over the press release made a few days ago.
See also: breathe, fire

breathe (new) life into something

to make something that was boring seem interesting again Breathe new life into a tired old bathroom with a coat of brightly coloured paint in this season's exciting colours.
See also: breathe, life

not breathe a word

to not tell people a secret Please tell me what happened. I promise I won't breathe a word.
See also: breathe, word

live and breathe something

if you live and breathe an activity or subject, you spend most of your time doing it or thinking about it because you like it so much For twenty years I've lived and breathed dance. It's been my whole life.
See also: and, breathe, live

as I live and breathe

For sure, definitely, as in As I live and breathe, I've never seen a more beautiful view. This expression is generally used to emphasize the truth of a statement and has been so used since the mid-1600s, although sometimes it was put simply as as I live. However, the complete phrase was also used early on, as in Arthur Murphy's 1756 play The Apprentice (2:1): "As I live and breathe, we shall both be taken, for heaven's sake let us make our escape."
See also: and, breathe, live

breathe down someone's neck

1. Pursue someone closely; pose a threat to one, as in The immigration authorities were breathing down his neck. [Mid-1900s]
2. Watch or supervise someone very closely, as in The boss is always breathing down our necks. [Mid-1900s]
See also: breathe, down, neck

breathe easy

Also, breathe easily or freely . Relax, feel relieved from anxiety, stress, or tension. For example, Now that exams are over with, I can breathe easy, or Whenever I'm back in the mountains, I can breathe freely again. This idiom originally (late 1500s) was put as breathe again, implying that one had stopped breathing (or held one's breath) while feeling anxious or nervous. Shakespeare had it in King John (4:2): "Now I breathe again aloft the flood." The variant dates from the first half of the 1800s.
See also: breathe, easy

breathe life into

Also, breathe new life into. Revive someone or something. For example, Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) shows one how to breathe life into a drowning victim , or Her appointment breathed new life into the firm. This term is used both literally, for reviving a person who has stopped breathing temporarily, and figuratively, for giving new impetus to or renewing some project. Also see breath of fresh air.
See also: breathe, life

breathe one's last

Die, as in Aunt Agatha breathed her last on Tuesday. This term was used by Shakespeare in 3 Henry VI (5:2): "Montague has breathed his last." It has survived but today is considered a poetic euphemism.
See also: breathe, last

not breathe a word

Not reveal a secret, keep concealed, as in You must promise not to breathe a word of what I'm about to tell you. This phrase relies on the verb breathe as meaning "to utter," a usage dating from the late 1500s.
See also: breathe, not, word

breathe in

v.
1. To inhale: Don't forget to breathe in and hold your breath before you jump into the water!
2. To take something into the lungs by inhaling: My lungs are unhealthy because I've been breathing in smoke from the factory for so many years. There is poisonous gas here; don't breathe it in.
See also: breathe

breathe out

v.
1. To exhale: Breathe out slowly, and you will relax more easily.
2. To expel something from the lungs by exhaling: I closed my eyes and breathed out a sigh. The yoga instructor told everyone to take a big breath, hold it for ten seconds, and then breathe it out.
See also: breathe, out

breathe down (someone's) neck

1. To threaten by proximity, especially by pursuing closely.
2. To watch or monitor closely, often annoyingly: The boss was breathing down my neck all morning.
See also: breathe, down, neck

breathe

easily/easy/freely
To be relaxed or relieved, especially after a period of tension.

breathe (one's) last

To die.
See also: breathe, last
References in periodicals archive ?
Most working professionals tend to sit stiff through the day, they hardly breathe and hold their breathe often, which is hazardous," says Atre.
According to Dagar, most of us use only 30 per cent of our lung capacity when we breathe.
Being aware of the way you breathe can positively impact your health, confidence and stress levels.
Many children in western society habitually breathe through their mouths rather than through their noses.
10) A child who has a blocked nose or who has a perceived or real difficulty getting enough air will either become obliged to breathe through their mouth rather than through their nose or choose the oral route because it is more comfortable or has become habitual.
who mouth breathe during sleep, snore, or have sleep apnoea, have an increased incidence of learning and behavioural difficulties and show signs of delayed intellectual development, poor impulse control, hyperactivity and altered neural processing.
So when you breathe mindfully, you're bringing your mind back to your body and you become fully present.
Mortola thinks that dunnarts breathe entirely with their lungs at about one month old
When you learn how to breathe properly, you become more aware of your body and start to understand how your breathing affects not only your heart rate and nervous system but also your emotions,' says Christopher Hansard, director of the Eden Medical Centre in London (020-7881 5800).
As children we breathe freely and easily but as we mature, we pick up bad breathing habits because of our busy, stressful lifestyles,' claims Fenella Lindsell, director and founder of Art of Health in London.
Breathe through your nose and keep your mouth closed, especially when exercising.
We were excited to host Jen and Jerry and to participate in the show," says Gayle Bulls Dixon, founder of Breathe Spa.
Breathe Spa Signature 100 percent cotton Robe with classic shawl collar adorned with the Breathe Spa logo, Zents Bath Salts and a Breathe handcrafted pillar candle featuring fragrances that invoke and inspire the senses with colors that complement any decor ($149).
The Taoist approach to breath is very different: there is no counting or setting a certain rhythm or telling the intelligence of the lungs how it should breathe.
How does the body know when to breathe and how to breathe?