breathed


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Related to breathed: breathtakingly
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(not) breathe a word

To share information that is supposed to be kept secret. Often used in the negative to encourage silence. And if you breathe a word of this to the cops, we'll come after you. I was told not to breathe a word, but I knew I had to tell someone about such serious allegations.
See also: breathe, word

breathe easy

To feel calm or relieved because a stressful situation has ended. With your thesis defense finished, you can finally breathe easy! All week, I was worried about having to give that presentation, so I can breathe easy again now that it's done!
See also: breathe, easy

breathe fire

To strongly express one's anger, typically verbally. Unless you want to get yelled at, stay away from the boss today—he's breathing fire over that printing mishap.
See also: breathe, fire

breathe in

To inhale. A noun can be used between "breathe" and "in" to state a specific substance being inhaled. The doctor held the stethoscope to my chest and asked me to breathe in. After many years of breathing in pollution, I now have asthma. Breathe the fresh air in and try to relax.
See also: breathe

breathe into (something)

1. To exhale into something, such as a container, device, or (in the case of mouth-to-mouth resuscitation) another person's mouth. In an effort to calm myself down, I tried breathing into a paper bag. The doctor asked me to breathe into a special device. After pulling the drowning boy to safety, the lifeguard started chest compressions on him and breathed into his mouth.
2. To figuratively revive and revitalize something that has become dull or stale. In this phrase, a noun is used between "breathe" and "into." The new CEO's creative approach really breathed new life into that failing company.
See also: breathe

breathe (up)on (someone or something)

To exhale onto someone or something. Quit breathing on me with your germs—I don't want to get sick, too! The engagement ring is so expensive that I'm nervous to even breathe upon it!
See also: breathe

breathe out

To exhale. A noun can be used between "breathe" and "out" to state a specific substance being exhaled. The doctor held the stethoscope to my chest and asked me to breathe in and then breathe out. When you do this meditation, try to imagine that you are breathing your stress out with each exhale.
See also: breathe, out

breathe a sigh of relief

To experience an intense feeling of happiness or relief because something particularly stressful, unpleasant, or undesirable has been avoided or completed. Everyone in class breathed a sigh of relief after that horrible midterm exam was over. Investors are breathing a big sigh of relief now that the predicted downturn has seemingly been avoided.
See also: breathe, of, relief, sigh

breathe a sigh of relief

 
1. Lit. to sigh in a way that signals one's relief that something has come to an end. At the end of the contest, we all breathed a sigh of relief.
2. Fig. to express relief that something has ended. With the contract finally signed, we breathed a sigh of relief as we drank a toast in celebration.
See also: breathe, of, relief, sigh

breathe easy

to assume a relaxed state after a stressful period. After this crisis is over, I'll be able to breathe easy again. He won't be able to breathe easy until he pays off his debts.
See also: breathe, easy

breathe in

to inhale; to take air into the lungs. Now, relax and breathe in. Breathe out. Breathe in deeply; enjoy the summer air.
See also: breathe

breathe out

to exhale. Now, breathe out, then breathe in. The doctor told me to breathe out slowly.
See also: breathe, out

breathe something in

to take something into the lungs, such as air, medicinal vapors, gas, etc. Breathe the vapor in slowly. It will help your cold. Breathe in that fresh air!
See also: breathe

breathe something out

to exhale something. At last, he breathed his last breath out, and that was the end. Breathe out your breath slowly.
See also: breathe, out

breathe easy

Also, breathe easily or freely . Relax, feel relieved from anxiety, stress, or tension. For example, Now that exams are over with, I can breathe easy, or Whenever I'm back in the mountains, I can breathe freely again. This idiom originally (late 1500s) was put as breathe again, implying that one had stopped breathing (or held one's breath) while feeling anxious or nervous. Shakespeare had it in King John (4:2): "Now I breathe again aloft the flood." The variant dates from the first half of the 1800s.
See also: breathe, easy

breathe fire

be fiercely angry.
The implied comparison in this expression is with a fire-breathing dragon.
See also: breathe, fire

breathe in

v.
1. To inhale: Don't forget to breathe in and hold your breath before you jump into the water!
2. To take something into the lungs by inhaling: My lungs are unhealthy because I've been breathing in smoke from the factory for so many years. There is poisonous gas here; don't breathe it in.
See also: breathe

breathe out

v.
1. To exhale: Breathe out slowly, and you will relax more easily.
2. To expel something from the lungs by exhaling: I closed my eyes and breathed out a sigh. The yoga instructor told everyone to take a big breath, hold it for ten seconds, and then breathe it out.
See also: breathe, out
References in periodicals archive ?
You've also breathed out about 200 milliliters (6 fluid ounces) of carbon dioxide.
Best known for introducing the characters Opus and Bill the Cat to the world, Breathed has been awarded a contract to create a unique character for Ants.
I put Opus and friends to bed four years ago, and since then my time has been spent writing and directing theatrical projects in Hollywood," said Berkeley Breathed.
com community, Breathed has the opportunity to earn referral commissions when people he has referred to Ants.
2 -- color) During the fund-raising walk, some students breathed through straws to simulate breathing problems from smoking.