break ship

break ship

To fail to return to one's ship when one is supposed to. There's still been no sign of him, captain—I think he broke ship.
See also: break, ship

break ship

fail to rejoin your ship after absence on leave.
See also: break, ship
References in periodicals archive ?
After the break Ship had the wind in their favour, but Lancelyn skipper Steve Padmore - ably assisted by young Danny Beattie and Stewy Jones - were more than equal to the challenge at the back and gave adequate cover to stand-in goalkeeper, Ian Howard who was rarely troubled.
Workers break ships without safety equipment, by hand, and many are killed in explosions or die of suffocation from exposure to toxic fumes and asbestos dust.
It has a capacity to break ships ranging from 800 tonnes to 50,000 tonnes on its 70 metre plot in Alang (Gujarat), which is the centre of the ship-breaking and recycling industry in Asia.
Hartlepool's Able UK has been negotiating with the Environment Agency for years to be allowed to break ships, having been at the centre of a media frenzy over its plans to dismantle the "ghost ships" of the US fleet in 2003.
Last night he said his operation would be the obvious choice for anyone looking to break ships, but that neither his company nor MM had yet been contacted by Defra, which wrote the report.
BEARING in mind the trouble which was raised when the American Armada was brought to Hartlepool to be scrapped, the latest idea for Swan's yard to break ships will seriously test local relationships ( ie jobs v environment.
Mr Kroese last night claimed Swan Hunter would be the only yard in the UK able to break ships, and one of only a handful in Europe.