branch

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Related to branched: Branched chain amino acids, branched out

offer the olive branch (to someone)

To extend an offer or gesture of peace, reconciliation, truce, etc. (to someone), so as to end a disagreement or dispute. (Can also be formulated as "offer someone the olive branch.") The conservatives in Congress seem to be offering the olive branch to Democrats on the issue of raising the debt ceiling. If you find yourself in a spat with a friend, try to be the bigger person and be the one to offer the olive branch. I was still hurt by the way my parents had lied to me, but I decided to offer them the olive branch at Christmas.
See also: branch, offer, olive

offer an olive branch (to someone)

To extend an offer or gesture of peace, reconciliation, truce, etc. (to someone), so as to end a disagreement or dispute. (Can also be formulated as "offer someone an olive branch.") The conservatives in Congress seem to be offering an olive branch to Democrats on the issue of raising the debt ceiling. If you find yourself in a spat with a friend, try to be the bigger person and be the one to offer an olive branch. I was still hurt by the way my parents had lied to me, but I decided to offer them an olive branch at Christmas.
See also: branch, offer, olive

an/the olive branch

A symbol, expression, or gesture of peace, reconciliation, truce, etc. Used most commonly in the phrase "hold out/offer (someone) an/the olive branch." The conservatives in Congress seem to be offering the olive branch to Democrats on the issue of raising the debt ceiling. If you find yourself in a spat with a friend, try to be the bigger person and be the one to hold out the olive branch.
See also: branch, olive

private branch exchange

A telephone system within an institution or business that can only be used by the people inside that establishment. There was an issue with the private branch exchange this morning, but we hope to have the phones working again shortly.
See also: branch, exchange, private

branch off (from something)

to separate off from something; to divide away from something. A small stream branched off from the main channel. An irrigation ditch branched off here and there.
See also: branch, off

branch out

 (from something)
1. Lit. [for a branch] to grow out of a branch or trunk. (Having to do with plants and trees.) A twig branched out of the main limb and grew straight up. The bush branched out from the base.
2. Fig. to expand away from something; to diversify away from narrower interests. The speaker branched out from her prepared remarks. The topic was very broad, and she was free to branch out.
See also: branch, out

branch out (into something)

Fig. to diversify and go into new areas. I have decided to branch out into some new projects. Business was very good, so I decided to branch out.
See also: branch, out

hold out the olive branch

Fig. to offer to end a dispute and be friendly; to offer reconciliation. (The olive branch is a symbol of peace and reconciliation. A biblical reference.) Jill was the first to hold out the olive branch after our argument. I always try to hold out the olive branch to someone I have offended. Life is too short for a person to bear grudges for very long.
See also: branch, hold, olive, out

branch out

also branch off
to become involved in a wider range of activities Women are branching out into leadership roles at many levels in the army.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of branch (the part of a tree that grows out from the main part)
See also: branch, out

hold out/offer an olive branch

to do or say something in order to show that you want to end a disagreement with someone
Usage notes: An olive branch is traditionally a symbol of peace.
(often + to ) He held out an olive branch to the opposition by releasing 42 political prisoners.
See also: branch, hold, olive, out

root and branch

  (formal)
if something is changed or removed root and branch, it is changed or removed completely because it is bad Racism must be eliminated, root and branch. (formal)
See also: and, branch, root

branch off

Diverge, subdivide, as in It's the house on the left, just after the road branches off, or English and Dutch branched off from an older parent language, West Germanic. This term alludes to a tree's growth pattern, in which branches grow in separate directions from the main trunk. [Second half of 1800s] Also see branch out.
See also: branch, off

branch out

Separate into subdivisions; strike off in a new direction. For example, Our software business is branching out into more interactive products, or Bill doesn't want to concentrate on just one field; he wants to branch out more. This term alludes to the growth habits of a tree's limbs. [Early 1700s] Also see branch off.
See also: branch, out

olive branch

A symbol of peace, an offering of good will, as in They feuded for years, but finally the Hatfields came over bearing an olive branch. This term is alluded to in the Bible (Genesis 8:11), where the dove comes to Noah after the flood with an olive leaf in its mouth. [c. 1600]
See also: branch, olive

root and branch

Utterly, completely, as in The company has been transformed root and branch by the new management. Alluding to both the underground and aboveground parts of a tree, this idiom was first recorded in 1640.
See also: and, branch, root

branch off

v.
1. To separate from a main road or path and follow a smaller one: Take a left where the main trail branches off onto a footpath.
2. To separate from a primary source or origin and move or develop in a different direction: After we discovered a new species of insect, some members of our research team branched off and are studying it. A new political group has branched off from the old party.
See also: branch, off

branch out

v.
1. To develop or have many branches or tributaries: Once this tree reaches a certain size, it will begin to branch out. The river branches out into a great delta before flowing into the sea.
2. To grow out of a tree trunk or branch: I like to sit on a large limb that branches out from the apple tree.
3. To expand the scope of one's interests or activities into a new area or areas: At first I studied only Latin, but later I branched out and began learning other languages, too.
See also: branch, out

root and branch

Utterly; completely: The organization has been transformed root and branch by its new leaders.
See also: and, branch, root
References in classic literature ?
At the edge of this vast hole, which was none other than the pit marked on the old Dom's map, the Great Road branched into two and circumvented it.
Then he had penetrated further, lower, beneath all that finished, material, limited knowledge; he had, perhaps, risked his soul, and had seated himself in the cavern at that mysterious table of the alchemists, of the astrologers, of the hermetics, of which Averroès, Gillaume de Paris, and Nicolas Flamel hold the end in the Middle Ages; and which extends in the East, by the light of the seven- branched candlestick, to Solomon, Pythagoras, and Zoroaster.
So he strode whistling along the leafy forest path that led to Fosse Way, turning neither to the right hand nor the left, until at last he came to where the path branched, leading on the one hand onward to Fosse Way, and on the other, as well Little John knew, to the merry Blue Boar Inn.
Two roads led out of the town on the eastern side; one branched off towards the Ambroses' villa, the other struck into the country, eventually reaching a village on the plain, but many footpaths, which had been stamped in the earth when it was wet, led off from it, across great dry fields, to scattered farm-houses, and the villas of rich natives.
In about an hour they came to a place where another road branched off.
Beyond this first chamber there were others, and back of them the building branched out into enormous wings.
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