bowl over

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bowl someone over

1. Lit. to knock someone over. (Fixed order.) We were bowled over by the wind. Bob hit his brother and bowled him over.
2. Fig. to surprise or overwhelm someone. (Fixed order.) The news bowled me over. The details of the proposed project bowled everyone over.
See also: bowl

bowl somebody over

also bowl over somebody
1. to cause someone to fall by hitting them with your body Reagan burst through the door, practically bowling over Jeanne.
2. to completely surprise someone I was totally bowled over by the beautiful gift from the office staff. The party completely bowled him over.
Etymology: based on the game of bowling, in which a ball is rolled toward a group of wooden objects with the intention of making them fall
See also: bowl

bowl over

Astonish, surprise greatly, overwhelm, as in I was simply bowled over by their wonderful performance. This term originated in cricket, where it means "to knock all the bails off the wicket." [Mid-1800s]
See also: bowl

bowl over

1. To knock someone or something down to the ground: The kids ran down the hallway, bowling over everyone in their way. A strong wind will bowl that billboard over.
2. To make a powerful impression on someone; astound someone: She bowled over everyone at the meeting with her amazing presentation. His new songs bowled me over, so I bought his new CD. You must go hear this poet—you will be bowled over!
See also: bowl
References in periodicals archive ?
He told the Chronicle: "There was a bit of jest in the morning I might have to bowl overs with Scotty hurting his finger.
Don't forget Simon has only played about 40 first-class games in his career and he needs to bowl overs.
To get back into the Test side I was told I had to bowl overs and take wickets, and I've done that.
People say (Andrew) Caddick likes to bowl overs, but he bowled a lot in Perth and you have to be careful because he's our senior bowler at the moment.
I know I need to bowl overs to get me ready and that is what I was going to do either in South Africa or with the Lions, until I thought I should give one-day cricket another go," said Harmison.