References in classic literature ?
In The Sheik's tent The Sheik rose at last, and, pointing toward the bound captive, turned to one of his lieutenants.
I am ready to cast off the ties that have bound me.
He had allowed himself to be led, pushed, carried, lifted, bound, and bound again.
Then he called in the other guards and together they fell upon the luckless men, kicking and beating them unmercifully, after which they bound the Englishman more securely than before and tied both men fast on opposite sides of the hut.
With difficulty Akut kept them in hand for a time; but when a particularly large wave struck the dugout simultaneously with a little squall of wind their terror broke all bounds, and, leaping to their feet, they all but overturned the boat before Akut and Tarzan together could quiet them.
They made way with foot and hand, kicking and thrusting dragging and shoving, the bound captives to either side of the space which the canoe was to occupy.
Then I'll pick a good ship bound for Europe, and arrive there with another pay-day.
As for this fellow we men will see to him: I reckon he is bound for Egypt or for Cyprus or to the Hyperboreans or further still.
HAVING been delayed for nearly a fortnight in the city, I was glad to escape on board a packet bound for Monte Video.
Quickly Bukawai bound the limp arms behind his prisoner's back, then he raised him to one of his shoulders, for, though Bukawai was old and diseased, he was still a strong man.
I came to myself in darkness, in great pain, bound hand and foot, and deafened by many unfamiliar noises.
Nay, you may have met with another whom you may love; and considering yourself as bound in honour to Elizabeth, this struggle may occasion the poignant misery which you appear to feel.
They had been seen on the Tower Wharf that morning, embarking on board the steamer bound for Rotterdam.
They came once in sight of the two men, but it was at a great distance; however, they had the satisfaction to see them cross over a valley towards the sea, quite the contrary way from that which led to their retreat, which they were afraid of; and being satisfied with that, they went back to the tree where they left their prisoner, who, as they supposed, was delivered by his comrades, for he was gone, and the two pieces of rope-yarn with which they had bound him lay just at the foot of the tree.
There is also another species of acquisition which they [1257a] particularly call pecuniary, and with great propriety; and by this indeed it seems that there are no bounds to riches and wealth.