bounce around

bounce something around (with someone)

to discuss something with a number of people; to move an idea from person to person like a ball. I need to bounce this around with my family. I need to bounce around something with you.
See also: around, bounce

bounce around

1. Move around from one person or place to another. For example, The staff spent the morning bouncing around ideas to improve sales, or She had been bouncing around from one job to another. This term alludes to a ball bouncing among players. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
2. Treat roughly or unfairly, as in Quit bouncing me around; I won't stand for it. This usage is based on a somewhat earlier meaning of bounce, "to beat up" or "coerce." ] Slang; c. 1970]
See also: around, bounce

bounce around

v.
1. To rebound repeatedly in various directions: The ball landed in my bedroom and bounced around, knocking over a vase on the shelf.
2. To cause something to rebound in various directions: Don't bounce the basketball around in the living room! Let's go outside and bounce around my new rubber ball.
3. To move about energetically or restlessly in various directions: The scared mouse bounced around all over the room. The kids are bouncing around in the back seat of the car.
4. To discuss something with a number of people: I bounced my new idea around at the meeting, and some people gave me some very interesting comments on it.
5. To circulate among a number of people. Used of a name, word, or idea: That rumor has been bouncing around here for years.
See also: around, bounce
References in periodicals archive ?
The organisers hope to attract 2,000 people and raise more than pounds 30,000 in the sponsored bounce around Roundhay Park.
Every day I am blessed to wake up to go and play football and I do bounce around with a smile on my face because I know how lucky I am.
When he's not climbing on to speakers or singing interesting, if inaudible lyrics, the rest of his black-clad band bounce around as if they've been dipping their Dib-Dab lolly in too much sherbet.
Air often carries water in the form of a gas called watervapor In this form, water molecules bounce around in the air, separate From one another.
The two bounce around New York City, getting into a bit of fun trouble that leads them to meet an intriguing cast of characters.
The safety pin is provided to attach the bandoleer to your uniform so it doesn't bounce around.
We just watch her bounce around the judging room singing Outkast, jumping on the table, talking about how site's a black girl and had trouble getting jobs back in the day 'cause she's black.
Listening to yourself sing is like crawling into a grand piano, closing the lid, and then hearing the sounds bounce around inside the box," says Ingo Titze, professor of speech science and voice at the University of Iowa.
And they'll likely bounce around the high 5 percent to low 6 percent range for the first quarter of 2004 before gradually moving up.
While most light waves that penetrate the tissue just bounce around wildly inside, a few travel in largely unimpeded, hit some internal structure, and then reflect straight back out again," Nolte says.
Pairs of leglike lines bounce around a box, alternately "standing," "resisting," "behaving," and "not behaving.
Regretfully, not too many sermons bounce around people's consciousness like a carefully dribbled basketball the next day, let alone be the subject of animated, serious discussion.
That "bad back" that kept Hillary Clinton from accompanying her husband to Central America had, we are told, recovered enough for her to bounce around on a camel ride in Egypt.
Liquids (water, oil, and lava) fall from "droppers" and bounce around the walls of a mechanism.
The sounds bounce around inside and become jumbled up into a rumbling noise before they enter the ear.