bounce


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Related to bounce: bounce game

bounced check

A written order to a bank for a certain amount of funds that has been dishonored because such funds are not available in the account in question. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. The bank notified me of several bounced checks that my husband has been writing around the country.
See also: bounce, check

on the bounce

In continuous, consecutive, unbroken succession. (Used primarily in reference to sporting outcomes.) Primarily heard in UK. After six losses on the bounce, the new manager of the football team is already being replaced. They had 10 straight wins on the bounce heading into this tournament, but they were outclassed and eliminated in the very first round.
See also: bounce, on

bounce off the walls

To be very active and energetic to the point of hyperactivity. How much sugar did you give the kids? They're bouncing off the walls!
See also: bounce, off, wall

bounce along

 
1. Lit. to move along bouncing. (As might be done by a ball.) The ball bounced along and finally came to rest. The beach ball sort of bounced along until it came to the water.
2. Fig. [for someone] to move along happily. He was so happy that he just bounced along. He stopped bouncing along when he saw all the work he had to do.
See also: bounce

bounce back

 (from something)
1. Lit. [for something] to rebound; [for something] to return bouncing from where it had been. The ball bounced back from the wall. A rubber ball always bounces back.
2. and bounce back (after something) Fig. [for someone] to recover after a disability, illness, blow, or defeat. (See also rebound from something.) She bounced back from her illness quickly. She bounced back quickly after her illness.
See also: back, bounce

bounce off (of something)

to rebound from something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) The ball bounced off the wall and struck a lamp. It hit the wall and bounced off.
See also: bounce, off

bounce out (of something)

to rebound out of or away from something. The ball bounced out of the corner into my hands. The ball bounced out of the box it had fallen into.
See also: bounce, out

bounce something around (with someone)

to discuss something with a number of people; to move an idea from person to person like a ball. I need to bounce this around with my family. I need to bounce around something with you.
See also: around, bounce

bounce something back and forth

 
1. Lit. to bat, toss, or throw something alternately between two people. (Usually a ball.) The two guys bounced the ball back and forth. John and Timmy bounced it back and forth.
2. Fig. to discuss an idea back and forth among a group of people. Let's bounce these ideas back and forth awhile and see what we come up with. The idea was bounced back and forth for about an hour.
See also: and, back, bounce, forth

bounce something off (of) someone or something

 
1. Lit. to make something rebound off someone or something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) She bounced the ball off the wall, turned, and tossed it to Wally. She bounced the ball off of Harry, into the wastebasket.
2. and bounce something off Fig. to try an idea or concept out on someone or a group. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Let me bounce off this idea, if I may. Can I bounce something off of you people, while you're here?
See also: bounce, off

bounce up and down

to spring up and down due to natural elasticity or from being jostled or thrown. The ball bounced up and down for an amazingly long time. I bounced up and down in the back of that truck for almost an hour.
See also: and, bounce, down, up

spring for something

 and bounce for something
Sl. to treat someone by buying something. I'm bouncing for pizza. Any takers? Ralph sprang for drinks, and we all had a great time.
See also: spring

That's the way the ball bounces.

 and That's the way the cookie crumbles.; That's the way the mop flops.
Prov. You cannot control everything that happens to you.; You should accept the bad things that happen. Bill: I bought a hundred lottery tickets this week, but I still didn't win! Alan: That's the way the ball bounces. I was planning to have fun on my vacation, but I've been sick the whole time. I guess that's just the way the cookie crumbles. That's tough, but that's the way the mop flops.
See also: ball, bounce, way

get the ax

to be forced to give up your job Which employees are most likely to get the ax when the company downsizes?
Related vocabulary: get the boot
See also: ax, get

bounce back (from something)

1. to become healthy again I bounced back in just a few days after the operation.
2. to return to a good condition The economy seems to have bounced back from the recession very quickly.
Etymology: based on the idea of a ball or sounds bouncing back (returning to a particular place)
See also: back, bounce

bounce around

1. Move around from one person or place to another. For example, The staff spent the morning bouncing around ideas to improve sales, or She had been bouncing around from one job to another. This term alludes to a ball bouncing among players. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
2. Treat roughly or unfairly, as in Quit bouncing me around; I won't stand for it. This usage is based on a somewhat earlier meaning of bounce, "to beat up" or "coerce." ] Slang; c. 1970]
See also: around, bounce

bounce back

Recover quickly, as in She had pneumonia, but she bounced back in less than a week. This expression is a metaphor for the rebound of a ball or some elastic material.
See also: back, bounce

get the ax

Also, get the boot or bounce or can or heave-ho or hook or sack . Be discharged or fired, expelled, or rejected. For example, He got the ax at the end of the first week, or The manager was stunned when he got the boot himself, or We got the bounce in the first quarter, or The pitcher got the hook after one inning, or Bill finally gave his brother-in-law the sack. All but the last of these slangy expressions date from the 1870s and 1880s. They all have variations using give that mean "to fire or expel someone," as in Are they giving Ruth the ax?Get the ax alludes to the executioner's ax, and get the boot to literally booting or kicking someone out. Get the bounce alludes to being bounced out; get the can comes from the verb can, "to dismiss," perhaps alluding to being sealed in a container; get the heave-ho alludes to heave in the sense of lifting someone bodily, and get the hook is an allusion to a fishing hook. Get the sack, first recorded in 1825, probably came from French though it existed in Middle Dutch. The reference here is to a workman's sac ("bag") in which he carried his tools and which was given back to him when he was fired. Also see give someone the air.
See also: ax, get

more bang for the buck

Also, more bounce for the ounce. More value for one's money, a greater return on an investment. For example, Buying a condominium is better than renting for years and years; more bang for the buck , or We always get the largest packages of dog food-more bounce for the ounce. The first term originated in the late 1960s in the military for expenditures for firepower and soon was extended to mean an increased financial return or better value. The variant originated in the mid-1900s as an advertising slogan for a carbonated soft drink.
See also: bang, buck, more

spring for

Pay another's expenses, treat, as in I'll spring for the dinner this time. [Slang; c. 1900]
See also: spring

that's how the ball bounces

Also, that's the way the ball bounces or the cookie crumbles . That is the way matters have worked out and nothing can be done about it. For example, I'm sorry you got fired but that's how the ball bounces, or They wanted a baby girl but got a third boy-that's the way the cookie crumbles. These phrases allude to an odd bounce or a crumbled cookie that cannot be put back together. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
See also: ball, bounce, how

bounce around

v.
1. To rebound repeatedly in various directions: The ball landed in my bedroom and bounced around, knocking over a vase on the shelf.
2. To cause something to rebound in various directions: Don't bounce the basketball around in the living room! Let's go outside and bounce around my new rubber ball.
3. To move about energetically or restlessly in various directions: The scared mouse bounced around all over the room. The kids are bouncing around in the back seat of the car.
4. To discuss something with a number of people: I bounced my new idea around at the meeting, and some people gave me some very interesting comments on it.
5. To circulate among a number of people. Used of a name, word, or idea: That rumor has been bouncing around here for years.
See also: around, bounce

bounce back

v.
1. To rebound after striking an object or a surface: I threw the tennis ball at the wall, and it bounced back and hit me on the head.
2. To recover quickly, as from a setback or illness: Although the surgery was difficult, the patient bounced back to good health very quickly.
See also: back, bounce

bounce off

v.
1. To cause something to rebound from something: She bounced the tennis ball off the wall.
2. To rebound from something or someone: The basketball hit the rim and bounced off.
3. To present some idea or thought to someone for comment or approval: I have been thinking about what we should do next, so let me bounce a few ideas off you.
See also: bounce, off

spring for

v.
To pay for something: My boss offered to spring for lunch.
See also: spring

bounce

1. in. [for a check] to be returned from the bank because of insufficient funds. (see also rubber (check).) The check bounced, and I had to pay a penalty fee.
2. tv. to write a bad check. He bounced another one, and this time the bank called him up to warn him about what would happen if he did it again.
3. in. to leave; to depart. It’s late. Let’s bounce.
4. tv. [for a bank] to refuse to honor a check. They bounced another of my checks today.
5. tv. to throw someone out. Willie bounced me, and I ran to my car and beat it.
6. n. pep; energy. I never have any bounce when I wake up early.

bounce something off (of) someone

tv. to try out an idea on someone; to get someone’s opinion of an idea. Let me bounce this off of you.
See also: bounce, of, off

bounce something off someone

verb
See also: bounce, off

deadcat bounce

n. a small, knee-jerk rally in one of the financial markets. (A dead cat—or any other animal—will bounce only slightly after being dropped. Refers to a stock index or security price that bounces up only slightly after a precipitous fall. Securities market.) The whole market gave only a deadcat bounce after the string of losses this last week.
See also: bounce

get the ax

verb
See also: ax, get

spring for something

and bounce for something
in. to treat (someone) by buying something. (see also pop for something.) Can you spring for coffee? I’ve got a case of the shorts. I’m bouncing for pizza. Any takers?
See also: spring

bounce for something

verb
See also: bounce

That’s the way the ball bounces

sent. That is life.; That is the random way things happen. It’s tough, I know, but that’s the way the ball bounces.
See also: ball, bounce, way
References in periodicals archive ?
I see you both as very impish, and in Bounce you plot Ben's character getting together with Gwyneth's.
Consumers can enter the Bounce dryer bar "Stick it and Forget it" sweepstakes by liking the Bounce Facebook page, going to the sweepstakes thumbnail, reading the rules, and sharing their most unforgettable fashion moments.
Season three of another hit Bounce TV series,Family Time , starring Omar Gooding and Angell Conwell, now takes over In The Cut's time slot, premiering Tues.
You can further test your bounce house newsletters and the audience by sending them on varying days, times of the month, and time of day.
Co-organiser Chris Smith, from Park Run, said: "We hope Huddersfield will get behind the bounce and behind the event.
Deposit accounts (noninterest checking and NOW accounts) are assigned a bounce protection limit, typically from $100 to $1,000, depending on the type of account.
Ground bounce experienced during in circuit digital testing is a transient voltage differential between the test system ground and DUT ground.
After the team's first major training session yesterday, goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon said the newly designed balls have a strange bounce.
Eyebrows were raised when McCoy picked Bounce Back over five other runners trained by Martin Pipe in this pounds 125,000 race as the horse had managed only one low-grade chasing success.
On top of this new development, Bounce Below is set to expand with more slides, tunnels, nets and routes, while 2015 will also see the opening of Junior Bounce, designed to offer an adventurous bounce experience for children aged three to six).
The EdTrIn agreement with Bounce also follows the acquisition of innovative Victorian Communications Technology companies, ProjectProject Pty Ltd, and learning management software developer, Finpa Australia Pty Ltd, as part of a strategy to develop Intellectual Property educational technology, educational and training content, communications and marketing strategies in house.
John Kerry would have to get his hands on some weapons-grade flubber to overcome his disappointing post-convention bounce readings.
Many banks, savings and loans, and credit unions offer courtesy overdraft protection or bounce-coverage plans so checks do not bounce and ATM, debit card, and other electronic or automatic transactions go through.
22, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- New season three episodes of the Bounce TV Original SeriesFamily Time have grown its audience for third consecutive week.