bought


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Related to bought: bought the farm

been there, done that, bought the T-shirt

A jocular, sarcastic, or condescending expression of familiarity and/or boredom with a certain situation or thing. Refers to buying a T-shirt as a souvenir from a tourist destination as a memento. Oh, you're going to Paris this summer? Been there, done that, bought the T-shirt.
See also: been, bought, done

bought the farm

Died. Did you hear that old Walt bought the farm? What a shame—at least he got to spend 92 years on this earth.
See also: bought, farm

bring (someone or something) into view

To cause something to become visible or noticeable. The binoculars brought the far-off island into view. Unfortunately, my mother's illness also brought the declining state of her house into view for the rest of us.
See also: bring, view

buy a pig in a poke

To buy something without inspecting it thoroughly, often with negative consequences. A "poke" is a bag. Purchasing a home without inspecting it first is like buying a pig in a poke.
See also: buy, pig, poke

buy a/the round (of drinks)

To buy drinks for each person in a group. "Next" is commonly used before "round" (when "the" is the article). If your new friend is buying us a round of drinks, then I like him already! OK, who's buying the next round?
See also: buy, round

buy at

To purchase something for a particular price. I think we'll be able to buy these stocks at a better price if we wait a bit longer. My goal is to buy at 20 and sell at 25.
See also: buy

buy (something) back (from someone)

To repurchase something that one has sold. For the right price, I'm sure you'll be able to buy back your old house. Once the dealer realized how valuable that painting actually was, he wanted to buy it back from me.
See also: back, buy

buy in

1. To make a financial investment in a business or similar venture. No matter how you try to convince me that your latest scheme is going to make millions, I'm not buying in.
2. To believe in and support an idea, concept, or system. Rod's a good enough coach, but he just can't get the players to buy in—they still don't listen to him. We can't approach the CEO with our idea for overhauling the computer system until we get our boss to buy in first.
See also: buy

buy into (something)

1. To make a financial investment in a business or similar venture. I refuse to buy into my brother's latest scheme because I highly doubt it will ever make a penny—let alone millions.
2. To believe in and support an idea, concept, or system. Rod's a good enough coach, but he just can't get the players to buy into his system. We can't approach the CEO with our idea for overhauling the computer system until we get our boss to buy into it first.
See also: buy

buy it

1. slang To believe that something is true. My brother says that his latest scheme will make millions, but I'm not buying it. I told the teacher that my dog ate my homework, and she totally bought it! At least I think she did.
2. slang To die. When Ray got back last night, he told the boss that the informant bought it and won't be a problem anymore.
See also: buy

buy off

To pay someone to coerce them into doing something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "buy" and "off." Don't worry, the doorman won't say anything—I bought him off. Her campaign for mayor will be ruined if the public learns how many people she's bought off over the years.
See also: buy, off

buy (something) on credit

To buy something with the promise of paying for it later, as with a credit card as opposed to cash. I ran out of money at Christmastime and had to buy some presents on credit, so I'm dreading my next credit card bill.
See also: buy, credit, on

buy (something) on time

To buy something with the promise of paying for it later, as with a credit card as opposed to cash. I ran out of money at Christmastime and had to buy some presents on time, so I'm dreading my next credit card bill.
See also: buy, on, time

buy (someone or something) out

1. verb To buy one's shares or other financial interests in a company or joint venture, thus releasing one from it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "buy" and "out" or after "out." Because I bought out my sister, I now get all of the profit from the store.
2. verb To pay one an agreed-upon amount in exchange for one's premature release from a contract. A noun or pronoun can be used between "buy" and "out" or after "out." When no other teams were interested in trading for that player, we decided to buy him out.
3. verb To purchase something as its sole owner. A noun or pronoun can be used between "buy" and "out" or after "out." I've always loved that little music club, so I bought it out when the owner was ready to pursue other ventures. If they buy out our little company, will they jettison our staff?
4. verb To purchase all of a particular item or thing that is available. A noun or pronoun can be used between "buy" and "out" or after "out." That toy is so popular that it's been bought out all over town! We need as many balloons for the party as we can get, so just buy them out at the store.
5. noun The act of paying one an agreed-upon amount in exchange for one's premature release from a contract. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word ("buyout"). When no other teams were interested in trading for that player, we decided to offer him a buyout.
See also: buy, out

buy (something) sight unseen

To purchase something without seeing or examining it first. When I decided to buy a house sight unseen, I knew it would probably need a lot of repairs—and I was right!
See also: buy, sight, unseen

buy the big one

slang To die. We were so lucky to avoid that massive accident—we could have bought the big one!
See also: big, buy, one

buy the farm

slang To die. Did you hear that old Walt bought the farm? What a shame—at least he got to spend 92 years on this earth.
See also: buy, farm

buy time

To stall or delay in order to gain more time to do something. A noun, pronoun, or reflexive pronoun can be used between "buy" and "time," as can words like "more" and "some." I'm so sorry I'm running late to the party, but I'm almost there now—buy me some time so that I don't miss the cake-cutting! It's just such a big decision. What can we say to the bank to buy more time?
See also: buy, time

buy trouble

To do something that is likely to cause problems later. That kid isn't bullying you, so if you tattle on him to the teacher, you're definitely buying trouble.
See also: buy, trouble

buy up

1. To purchase all of a particular item or thing that is available. A noun or pronoun can be used between "buy" and "up." That toy is so popular that parents are buying it up all over town! Good luck getting a house in that town with investors buying up everything that goes on the market.
2. To purchase something quickly, perhaps in large quantities. A noun or pronoun can be used between "buy" and "up." As soon as people hear the word "snow" in the forecast, they start buying up milk and bread. Since it was announced that this model would no longer be made, collectors have begun buying it up.
See also: buy, up

buy (one's) way in(to) (something)

To pay money in order to gain access to a group or place. He bought his way into the organization through hefty donations. Listen, this isn't the sort of establishment where you can just buy your way in with a wad of cash.
See also: buy, way

buy wolf tickets

To challenge or respond hostilely to one's threats of violence or menacing, boastful words. Don't buy wolf tickets from that guy—I know for a fact that he carries a knife and would be all too happy to put it to use.
See also: buy, ticket, wolf

buy a pig in a poke

Fig. to buy something without looking inside first. If you don't get a good look at the engine of a used car before you buy it, you'll wind up buying a pig in a poke. I just took the salesman's word that this camera worked. I guess I bought a pig in a poke.
See also: buy, pig, poke

buy in

 (to something)
1. Lit. to purchase shares of something; to buy a part of something the ownership of which is shared with other owners. I bought into a company that makes dog food. Sounds like a good company. I would like to buy in.
2. Fig. to agree with; to accept an idea as worthwhile. The committee liked my proposal and decided to buy into my plan. Do you think you can get the whole board to buy in?
See also: buy

buy someone off

to bribe someone to ignore what one is doing wrong. Do you think you can buy her off? The mobster tried to buy off the jury.
See also: buy, off

buy something at something

 
1. to purchase something at a particular place or at a particular type of sale, such as a store, an auction, a clearance sale, etc. I bought this table at an auction. This was bought at an auction.
2. to purchase something at a particular price or for a particular level of price. I bought shares in General Motors at forty and a half. The shares were bought at a good price.
See also: buy

buy something up

to buy all of something; to buy the entire supply of something. He bought the oranges up from all the groves. He bought up all the oranges and drove up the price.
See also: buy, up

buy the big one

Euph. to die. I don't plan to buy the big one for at least another thirty years. She conked out for good—you know, bought the big one.
See also: big, buy, one

buy the farm

 and buy it
Sl. to die; to get killed. (The farm is a burial plot.) I'll pass through this illness; I'm too young to buy the farm. He lived for a few hours after his collapse, but then he bought it.
See also: buy, farm

buy time

to postpone an event hoping that the situation will improve. You are just stalling to buy time. Maybe I can buy some time by asking the judge for a continuance.
See also: buy, time

buy trouble

Fig. to encourage trouble; to bring on trouble. (As if certain acts would pay for or cause difficulties that would have to be suffered through.) I don't want to buy trouble. I have enough already. Saying something insulting to him is just buying trouble.
See also: buy, trouble

buy time

to obtain a longer period before something happens We were quickly running out of money but managed to buy time by getting a small loan.
See also: buy, time

bought

see under buy.

buy it

1. Suffer a severe reversal, as in If they can't raise the money in time, they'll buy it. [Slang; mid-1900s]
2. Be killed; die. For example, By the time we could get to the hospital, he had bought it. Originating during World War I as military slang, this term later was extended to peacetime forms of death. A later slang equivalent is buy the farm, dating from about 1950. For example, He'll soon buy the farm riding that motorcycle. According to J.E. Lighter, it alludes to training flights crashing in a farmer's field, causing the farmer to sue the government for damages sufficient to pay off the farm's mortgage. Since the pilot usually died in such a crash, he in effect bought the farm with his life.
3. Believe it; see buy something.
See also: buy

buy off

Pay to get rid of a claim or opposition, or to avoid prosecution, as in He was caught trying to buy off the opposing candidate. [First half of 1600s]
See also: buy, off

buy the farm

see under buy it.
See also: buy, farm

buy time

Increase the time available for a specific purpose. For example, Renting an apartment buys them time to look around for a new house.
See also: buy, time

buy up

Purchase all that is available, as in They want to buy up all the land in this area. This term was first recorded in a law enacted under Henry VIII: "They buy up all manner of fish."
See also: buy, up

buy off

v.
To bribe someone in order to ensure cooperation: I didn't get a speeding ticket because I bought off the police officer. The mobster avoided jail by buying the judge off.
See also: buy, off

buy up

v.
1. To purchase something entirely or completely: The real estate agent bought up all the land in the area. I wanted to get one of those T-shirts, but someone has already bought them up.
2. To quickly purchase as much of something as possible, especially when supplies are limited: People are buying up food supplies in case the blizzard hits. I bought all the donuts up at the bakery and took them to work.
See also: buy, up

buy it

tv. to die. (see also buy the farm, buy the big one.) He lay there coughing for a few minutes, and then he bought it.
See also: buy

buy the big one

tv. to die. She conked out for good—you know, bought the big one.
See also: big, buy, one

buy the farm

tv. to die; to get killed. (The farm may be a grave site. No one knows the origin.) I’m too young to buy the farm.
See also: buy, farm

buy it

Slang
To be killed.
See also: buy

buy the farm

Slang
To die, especially suddenly or violently.
See also: buy, farm

buy time

To increase the time available for a specific purpose: "A moderate recovery thus buys time for Congress and the Administration to whittle the deficit" (G. David Wallace).
See also: buy, time

buy the farm

Die. This phrase comes from the military: members of the armed forces were issued insurance policies. Many servicemen speculated that when they returned to civilian life, they would buy a farm back home or pay off the mortgage on one that they or their parents owned. To die was literally to retire, and so combat victims were said to have “bought the farm.” Other phrases that mean “to die” are “cash in your chips” (as if checking out of a poker game), “fall off the perch” (an expiring caged bird), and “go South” (someone now living up North returning to his or her native soil).
See also: buy, farm
References in classic literature ?
As I bought drinks--others treated as well--the thought flickered across my mind that Mammy Jennie wasn't going to be repaid much on her loan out of that week's earnings of the Razzle Dazzle.
The plot is bought and paid for--the final installment was made up, in part, out of my commissions from you.
em, it'll be because your friends have bought 'em for you, for you're dependent upon
I never asked anybody to buy the things in for me and my children; though there's the linen I spun, and I thought when Tom was born,--I thought one o' the first things when he was lying i' the cradle, as all the things I'd bought wi' my own money, and been so careful of, 'ud go to him.
I should be so loath for 'em to buy it at the Golden Lion," said the poor woman, her heart swelling, and the tears coming,--"my teapot as I bought when I was married, and to think of its being scratched, and set before the travellers and folks, and my letters on it,--see here, E.
She can agree to the list o' things to be bought in.
Make sure the valuation provisions don't provide an incentive for new shareholders to cause a triggering event and be bought out.
Among those who have already bought their gift, 49% of unmarried men in relationships say they have bought jewelry, compared to only one-third of married men.
The likelihood that a husband will buy his wife jewelry decreases with time: 23% of men married for 26 years or longer have bought jewelry this holiday season.
Unless men are told directly what to buy, it's unlikely that they have bought their present: 51% of men who say they have not been told directly what to buy have not yet bought a present.
Another highflier that gave the club members a boost was Infoseek, which they bought for $43 a share and unloaded at $49.
They bought Knight/Trimark initially for a split-adjusted $23.
Their best stock was Oracle, which they bought at a split-adjusted $39.
with that in mind, our researchers believe that this is bearish information about investors who bought in recently.
Best Book Buys is also the first online shopping comparison site to have a Buyback Search Service, which allows students to search for the best prices to sell back their textbooks whether or not they bought their books online.