bother

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be in a spot of bother

To be in a position of trouble, danger, difficulty, or unpleasantness, usually one which is not severe. I am in a spot of bother with this essay. I just can't seem to get the first paragraph right. He's been in a spot of bother ever since his business partner ran off with the pension funds.
See also: bother, of, spot

have a spot of bother

To have a small amount of trouble, difficulty, or unpleasantness with some task, thing, or person. You might have a spot of bother finding a job after college, but you should never give up! Joe had a spot of bother accepting Mary's newfound success.
See also: bother, have, of, spot

can't be bothered

Unwilling or disinclined to make the effort necessary to do or accomplish something. (Used in the present and past tenses almost interchangeably.) I can't be bothered to clean all those dishes after dinner, so I'll just leave them in the sink until the morning. A: "Did you go to Sarah's party last night?" B: "Nah, couldn't be bothered."
See also: bother

bother about (something)

To expend one's energy considering or addressing some issue. Often used in the negative to convey the opposite. Oh, don't bother about that commotion—things are always falling off the shelves in our basement.
See also: bother

bother (one's) (pretty little) head about (something)

To worry or concern oneself with something. Often used in the negative to encourage someone not to worry. When the adjectives "pretty little" are used before "head," the phrase can become patronizing or derisive. I think this issue will resolve itself quickly, so I'm not going to bother my head about it. Oh, don't you bother your pretty little head about the chaos in the kitchen—go back to watching TV.
See also: bother, head

bother with (someone or something)

1. To expend one's energy addressing a particular person or issue. Often used in the negative to convey the opposite. Don't bother with Billy—he just doesn't care about his grades, and no rewards, threats, or suggestions have helped. Oh, don't bother with all that stuff, I'll put it away.
2. To irritate someone by involving them in a particular issue. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "bother" and "with." He needs to stop bothering me with these complaints about the computer system because there's nothing I can do to fix the problem.
See also: bother

(it) doesn't bother me any

I have no objection to this. Sure, you can open the window in here—it doesn't bother me any.
See also: any, bother

(it) don't bother me none

I have no objection to this. Sure, you can open the window in here—it don't bother me none.
See also: bother, none

don't bother me

Do not do anything to disturb me; leave me alone. Don't bother me while I'm trying to do my homework. I'm going upstairs to take a nap. Please don't bother me!
See also: bother

go to the trouble

To make the effort to do something. Oh, you didn't have to go to the trouble of preparing the guest bedroom for me—I could have just slept on the couch!
See also: trouble

hot and bothered

1. Anxious or flustered. Don't get all hot and bothered—we'll figure out a solution to the problem before the boss hears about it.
2. In a state of sexual excitement. I can't help it—nerdy guys just get me hot and bothered.
See also: and, bother, hot

let alone

1. verb To stop bothering someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "let" and "alone." Why do you keep picking at that scab on your knee? Let it alone already! For the last time, let your brother alone—he needs to study!
2. expression Not to mention. The phrase is used to emphasize that if other more significant or pressing things are not possible or cannot be accommodated, a lesser thing certainly is not or cannot either. I hardly had time to brush my teeth this morning, let alone do my hair! We can't afford a vacation, let alone a trip to Disney World.
See also: alone, let

not bothered

1. Uninterested, unmotivated, or disinclined. Primarily heard in UK. It's clear that the government aren't bothered to put protection in place for workers stuck in a cycle of short-term contracts. If you're not bothered to do the work properly, then you can find a job elsewhere.
2. Impartial; having no preference one way or another. Primarily heard in UK. We could have pizza for dinner, but I'm not bothered if you want something else.
See also: bother, not

bother about something

to care about something; to take the trouble to deal with something. Please don't bother about this mess. I'll clean it up. Don't bother about it.
See also: bother

bother one's (pretty little) head about someone or something

Rur. to worry about something. (Stereotypically polite Southern talk to a woman; often said facetiously or patronizingly.) Now, don't bother your pretty little head about all this. Don't bother your head about me.
See also: bother, head

bother someone with someone or something

 and bother someone about someone or something
to annoy someone with someone or something; to worry someone about someone or something. (Either a physical annoyance or a mental annoyance.) Don't bother me with that! Don't bother yourself about the bill. I'll pay it.
See also: bother

bother with someone or something

to take the time or trouble to deal with someone or something. (Usually negative.) Please don't bother with Jill. She can take care of herself. Don't bother me with your problems.
See also: bother

Don't bother me!

Go away!; Leave me alone! Tom: Hey, Bill! Bill: Don't bother me! I'm busy. Can't you see? "Don't bother me! Leave me alone!" the child shouted at the dog.
See also: bother

go to the bother

(of doing something) Go to go to the trouble (of doing something).
See also: bother

go to the trouble (of doing something)

 and go to the trouble (to do something); go to the bother (of doing something); go to the bother (to do something)
to endure the effort or bother of doing something. I really don't want to go to the trouble to cook. Should I go to the bother of cooking something for her to eat? Don't go to the trouble. She can eat a sandwich.
See also: trouble

hot and bothered

 
1. Fig. excited; anxious. Now don't get hot and bothered. Take it easy. John is hot and bothered about the tax increase.
2. Fig. amorous; interested in romance or sex. John gets hot and bothered whenever Mary comes into the room. The dog seems hot and bothered. I think it's that time of the year again.
See also: and, bother, hot

(It) doesn't bother me any.

 and (It) doesn't bother me at all.
It does not trouble me at all.; I have no objection. (Compare this with (It) don't bother me none. Not very polite or cordial. See also (It) won't bother me any. for the future tense of this expression.) John: Do you mind if I sit here? Jane: Doesn't bother me any. Sally (smoking a cigarette): Do you mind if I smoke? Bill: It doesn't bother me any.
See also: any, bother

(It) don't bother me none.

Inf. It does not affect me one way or the other.; It doesn't bother me any. (Familiar and ungrammatical. Sometimes used for effect.) John: Mind if I sit here? Bob: It don't bother me none. Mary: Can I smoke? Bill: Don't bother me none.
See also: bother, none

(It) won't bother me any.

 and (It) won't bother me at all.
Inf. It will not trouble me at all.; I have no objection if you wish to do that. (Not very polite or cordial. For the present tense of this expression, see also (It) doesn't bother me any.) John: Will you mind if I sit here? Jane: Won't bother me any. Sally (lighting a cigarette): Do you mind if I smoke? Bill: It won't bother me at all.
See also: any, bother

let alone someone or something

not to mention or think of someone or something; not even to take someone or something into account. (Fixed order.) Do I have a dollar? I don't even have a dime, let alone a dollar. I didn't invite John, let alone the rest of his family.
See also: alone, let

let someone or something alone

 and leave someone or something alone; leave someone or something be
to avoid touching, bothering, or communicating with someone or something. Leave me alone. I don't want your help. Let it alone! Don't touch it! It may be hot!
See also: alone, let

go to the trouble

Also, take the trouble; go to the bother or the expense . Make the effort or spend the money for something. For example, He went to the trouble of calling every single participant, or She took the trouble to iron all the clothes, or Don't go to the bother of writing them, or They went to the expense of hiring a limousine. [Second half of 1800s] Also see put oneself out.
See also: trouble

hot and bothered

In a state of agitated excitement, flustered, as in She was all hot and bothered before her big opening. [c. 1920]
See also: and, bother, hot

let alone

2. Not to mention, as in We have no room for another house guest, let alone an entire family. [c. 1800]
See also: alone, let

hot and bothered

If someone gets hot and bothered about something, they become very upset or worried about it. Sir Terence was astonished that everybody had got so hot and bothered about the affair. The boss was asking for you earlier. He sounded hot and bothered. Note: You usually use this expression when you want to suggest that someone is getting upset about something unimportant.
See also: and, bother, hot

hot and bothered

in a state of anxiety or physical discomfort, especially as a result of being pressured.
See also: and, bother, hot

let aˈlone

used after a statement to emphasize that because the first thing is not true or possible, the next thing cannot be true or possible either: I wouldn’t speak to him, let alone trust him or lend him money.She didn’t even apologize, let alone offer to pay for the damage.
See also: alone, let

can’t be bothered (to do something)

(British English, informal) not willing to make the effort (to do something): I got home so late last night that I couldn’t be bothered to cook dinner.He didn’t have an excuse for not coming to the party — he just couldn’t be bothered.
See also: bother

I’m not ˈbothered

(informal, especially British English) I don’t mind: ‘What shall we have for supper tonight?’ ‘I’m not bothered.’
See also: bother, not

(all) hot and ˈbothered

(informal) worried and upset: Ministers are getting all hot and bothered about official secrets getting out.You’re looking a bit hot and bothered. Is everything OK?
See also: and, bother, hot

hot and bothered

Informal
In a state of agitated excitement; flustered: all hot and bothered before the opening performance.
See also: and, bother, hot

let alone

Not to mention; much less: "Their ancestors had been dirt poor and never saw royalty, let alone hung around with them" (Garrison Keillor).
See also: alone, let
References in periodicals archive ?
We are saying to the people in this group: "Don't bother us
Seven in ten adults 55 and older (71%) and two-thirds of those 45-54 (66%) say the fact the commercials seem louder bothers them a lot.
Women are more likely to say the change bothers them a lot (66% vs.
Those for whom the Internet has become part of the fabric of life feel most intensely about downtime: 23 percent of those 25-34 agreed that "downtime bothers me a great deal -- I even get angry now and then," while 21 percent of those 18-24 put themselves in that camp.
downtime bothers them but they try to "take it in stride most
Yet it's less the quality of the fights that bothers me, than some instinct that just tells me it's fundamentally wrong.
This obviously bothers many Republicans who, unlike their Democratic colleagues, were concerned about the rule of law, the principle that no man stands above the law and the dignity of the office of the president of the United States.
This obviously didn't bother the Democrats in the least as seen by their puritanical zeal in the House impeachment debates, and by the ferocity and nastiness of their attacks on anyone questioning this new privilege.
It's just when I'm standing still or jogging, or getting out of bed in the morning when it bothers me.
It bothers me because the Kings have been very good to me and the last two years I haven't done anything to help the team,'' he said by telephone from his hospital bed.
The rib doesn't affect me much at all and the knee injury isn't anything that really bothers me or keeps me from doing anything I need to do around the track.
And if they can't be bothered to get off their backsides and do the honourable thing, I don't see why anyone else should bother.
3 : to take the time or trouble <Don't bother to dress up.
4 : to intrude upon : interrupt <Don't bother me while I'm on the phone.