bother

(redirected from bothering)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

be in a spot of bother

To be in a position of trouble, danger, difficulty, or unpleasantness, usually one which is not severe. I am in a spot of bother with this essay. I just can't seem to get the first paragraph right. He's been in a spot of bother ever since his business partner ran off with the pension funds.
See also: bother, of, spot

have a spot of bother

To have a small amount of trouble, difficulty, or unpleasantness with some task, thing, or person. You might have a spot of bother finding a job after college, but you should never give up! Joe had a spot of bother accepting Mary's newfound success.
See also: bother, have, of, spot

can't be bothered

Unwilling or disinclined to make the effort necessary to do or accomplish something. (Used in the present and past tenses almost interchangeably.) I can't be bothered to clean all those dishes after dinner, so I'll just leave them in the sink until the morning. A: "Did you go to Sarah's party last night?" B: "Nah, couldn't be bothered."
See also: bother

bother about something

to care about something; to take the trouble to deal with something. Please don't bother about this mess. I'll clean it up. Don't bother about it.
See also: bother

bother one's (pretty little) head about someone or something

Rur. to worry about something. (Stereotypically polite Southern talk to a woman; often said facetiously or patronizingly.) Now, don't bother your pretty little head about all this. Don't bother your head about me.
See also: bother, head

bother someone with someone or something

 and bother someone about someone or something
to annoy someone with someone or something; to worry someone about someone or something. (Either a physical annoyance or a mental annoyance.) Don't bother me with that! Don't bother yourself about the bill. I'll pay it.
See also: bother

bother with someone or something

to take the time or trouble to deal with someone or something. (Usually negative.) Please don't bother with Jill. She can take care of herself. Don't bother me with your problems.
See also: bother

Don't bother me!

Go away!; Leave me alone! Tom: Hey, Bill! Bill: Don't bother me! I'm busy. Can't you see? "Don't bother me! Leave me alone!" the child shouted at the dog.
See also: bother

go to the bother

(of doing something) Go to go to the trouble (of doing something).
See also: bother

go to the trouble (of doing something)

 and go to the trouble (to do something); go to the bother (of doing something); go to the bother (to do something)
to endure the effort or bother of doing something. I really don't want to go to the trouble to cook. Should I go to the bother of cooking something for her to eat? Don't go to the trouble. She can eat a sandwich.
See also: trouble

hot and bothered

 
1. Fig. excited; anxious. Now don't get hot and bothered. Take it easy. John is hot and bothered about the tax increase.
2. Fig. amorous; interested in romance or sex. John gets hot and bothered whenever Mary comes into the room. The dog seems hot and bothered. I think it's that time of the year again.
See also: and, bother, hot

(It) doesn't bother me any.

 and (It) doesn't bother me at all.
It does not trouble me at all.; I have no objection. (Compare this with (It) don't bother me none. Not very polite or cordial. See also (It) won't bother me any. for the future tense of this expression.) John: Do you mind if I sit here? Jane: Doesn't bother me any. Sally (smoking a cigarette): Do you mind if I smoke? Bill: It doesn't bother me any.
See also: any, bother

(It) don't bother me none.

Inf. It does not affect me one way or the other.; It doesn't bother me any. (Familiar and ungrammatical. Sometimes used for effect.) John: Mind if I sit here? Bob: It don't bother me none. Mary: Can I smoke? Bill: Don't bother me none.
See also: bother, none

(It) won't bother me any.

 and (It) won't bother me at all.
Inf. It will not trouble me at all.; I have no objection if you wish to do that. (Not very polite or cordial. For the present tense of this expression, see also (It) doesn't bother me any.) John: Will you mind if I sit here? Jane: Won't bother me any. Sally (lighting a cigarette): Do you mind if I smoke? Bill: It won't bother me at all.
See also: any, bother

let alone someone or something

not to mention or think of someone or something; not even to take someone or something into account. (Fixed order.) Do I have a dollar? I don't even have a dime, let alone a dollar. I didn't invite John, let alone the rest of his family.
See also: alone, let

let someone or something alone

 and leave someone or something alone; leave someone or something be
to avoid touching, bothering, or communicating with someone or something. Leave me alone. I don't want your help. Let it alone! Don't touch it! It may be hot!
See also: alone, let

somebody can't be bothered to do something

someone has decided it is not important to do something If I'm just going to the gym in the morning, I can't be bothered to put on makeup.
Usage notes: sometimes used in the form someone could not be bothered with something
See also: bother

hot and bothered

angry and excited Dad gets all hot and bothered if someone parks in his parking space.
See also: and, bother, hot

let alone do something

and to an even greater degree do something We were trapped in a situation you can barely imagine, let alone understand.
Usage notes: used to emphasize the extreme character of something
Related vocabulary: not to mention somebody/something
See also: alone, let

let somebody alone

to not annoy or interrupt someone leave somebody alone I tried to keep my promise not to call her, to let her alone to think, but finally I needed to talk to her.
See also: alone, let

go to the trouble (of doing something)

also take the trouble (to do something)
to make an effort to do something If anyone had gone to the trouble of looking up his record, the police would not have released him.
See also: trouble

(all) hot and bothered

  (informal)
worried or angry, and sometimes physically hot Dad gets all hot and bothered if someone parks in his parking space.
See also: and, bother, hot

go to the trouble

Also, take the trouble; go to the bother or the expense . Make the effort or spend the money for something. For example, He went to the trouble of calling every single participant, or She took the trouble to iron all the clothes, or Don't go to the bother of writing them, or They went to the expense of hiring a limousine. [Second half of 1800s] Also see put oneself out.
See also: trouble

hot and bothered

In a state of agitated excitement, flustered, as in She was all hot and bothered before her big opening. [c. 1920]
See also: and, bother, hot

let alone

2. Not to mention, as in We have no room for another house guest, let alone an entire family. [c. 1800]
See also: alone, let

hot and bothered

Informal
In a state of agitated excitement; flustered: all hot and bothered before the opening performance.
See also: and, bother, hot

let alone

Not to mention; much less: "Their ancestors had been dirt poor and never saw royalty, let alone hung around with them" (Garrison Keillor).
See also: alone, let
References in periodicals archive ?
In the second incident, had it been a clear case of Pronto One altering course off Here Comes Baby's heels and bothering Talara, you'd blame it all on Here Comes Baby.
Bradley left Monday's game in the first inning after he awkwardly hit first base while running out a groundball, and later hinted to reporters that the knee had been bothering him for some time.
And while Tracy won't publicly give his opinion, he suggested that he had some idea as to what is bothering Green.
With the blister bothering him since the fourth inning, he relied on just two pitches in his final innings and produced one of his most effective outings in weeks, allowing just one baserunner in his last three innings.
It's been bothering me for like a week, and I aggravated it (Friday) in the New Jersey game.
When you're limited to two pitches, and he wasn't throwing his curveball very sharply because (the blister) was still bothering him, it kind of limits how you're going to attack guys,'' Dodgers catcher Chad Kreuter said.
Earlier in the week, he said the tailbone was bothering him to the point where he expected to sit out and miss the first game of his UCLA career.
How is it that basketball player Baron Davis is criticized for not bothering to finish his schooling at UCLA and Kwan is criticized for bothering to start hers?
His back has been bothering him since last week, but he has improved enough to take grounders and hit in the batting cage the last two days.
Witness Kenneth Maxie said the man told police, ``I'm not bothering anyone.
My neck was bothering me, my shoulder was bothering me, and (there was) a little bit of embarrassment, too,'' Butler said.
Unfortunately for the hot pitcher, a left-hip problem that has been bothering him since May 24 caused him to leave the mound after six innings.
If there's no reward, there's no motivation for him to keep bothering you.
Her legs have been bothering her,'' coach George Martin said.