bother with

bother with (someone or something)

1. To expend one's energy addressing a particular person or issue. Often used in the negative to convey the opposite. Don't bother with Billy—he just doesn't care about his grades, and no rewards, threats, or suggestions have helped. Oh, don't bother with all that stuff, I'll put it away.
2. To irritate someone by involving them in a particular issue. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "bother" and "with." He needs to stop bothering me with these complaints about the computer system because there's nothing I can do to fix the problem.
See also: bother

bother someone with someone or something

 and bother someone about someone or something
to annoy someone with someone or something; to worry someone about someone or something. (Either a physical annoyance or a mental annoyance.) Don't bother me with that! Don't bother yourself about the bill. I'll pay it.
See also: bother

bother with someone or something

to take the time or trouble to deal with someone or something. (Usually negative.) Please don't bother with Jill. She can take care of herself. Don't bother me with your problems.
See also: bother
References in periodicals archive ?
Then again, Hollywood was too busy cranking out franchises like ``Friday the 13th'' (nine movies), ``Halloween'' (six) and ``Nightmare on Elm Street'' (six) to bother with unprofitable invention.
Blair Witch'' doesn't bother with gore or guts or glorified serial killers.
He didn't bother with nobody, didn't mess with nobody.