a bossy boots

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a bossy boots

  (British & Australian informal)
an impolite way of describing someone who always tells other people what to do Karen's such a bossy boots - ordering us around all the time.
See also: boot
References in periodicals archive ?
I have also had several male bosses who could only ever be described as bossy.
Can you even imagine a male elected official being described as bossy, no matter how overbearing he might be?
Surely if a girl's ambition to do whatever she wants is stifled because someone calls her a notvery-horrible thing like bossy then really, she's not cut out for it in the first place.
Bossy realize she needed to ask more questions and be open to learning.
When he is acting bossy try not to give in to his demands, and remind him to be polite and patient when asking for things.
In Clara and the Bossy, Clara leads a happy, unassuming life until she meets Madison who revels from any kind of attention.
But, at the same time, it was neither overbearing nor bossy.
Car bays are defined with blocks of colour rather than the usual bossy lines.
The straight talking Scouser certainly looks the part for her role as a bossy pantomime witch in these floor length scarlet robes.
It was called The Bossy Christmas Fairies and it was magical.
Since he is usually one of the most moderate of those bossy saints telling me how to live my life, I would like to know what he knows about the holy-making nature of going to work that I do not.
In his lectures, collected in this volume, Bossy is aware of Evennett and Hay's contributions and suggests, like them, a new perspective for studies on post-Reformation Europe.
Following Bossy, he argues that the resulting system suited the kin-based society of that period, and especially its elite, by ensuring that feuds between kin groups would not be disturbed by the inconven ient ritual requirement of a peaceable gathering for mass each Sunday.
The key was the French Ambassador's household and Prof Bossy describes how a mole in the Ambassador's employ passed information to the Queen's Secretary of State and what resulted from this.
In his review of several books on suburbia ("Room to Grow," February), Sam Staley contends that sprawl-and-mall suburbs are simply what people want and implies that any alternative is bound to be something bossy and over-planned like Celebration, Florida.