borscht belt

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borscht belt

The resort area of the Catskill Mountains in upstate New York once predominately patronized by American Jews. Borscht is a type of soup that originated in Eastern Europe. A lot of Jewish comedians got their start playing the Borscht Belt in upstate New York.
See also: belt
References in periodicals archive ?
Se podia comer el shop suey en los restaurantes del Callejon de Dolores y aparecian establecimientos de polacos y rusos para su propio consumo y muy particular el guefiltefish, preparado a base de tres pescados diferentes, las sopas borsht de betabel fria o la de kreplaj de albondigas de harina de trigo.
These were the Sephardim, and unlike the Ashkenazim--who brought with them the cheesecakes of eastern Europe, the borsht of Russia and the strudels of Hungary--they embraced the customs and traditions of their new homes and established their own particular cuisine.
Borsht, shashlik, strawberries Romanoff, sauteed sturgeon, caviar and other Russian-style dishes are now on the menu (through April 20) at Impresario and Otto's Grill at the Music Center in honor of the local appearance of Russian conductor Valery Gergiev.
The abundant choices in soups range from vegetable, tomato and onion to borsht, chowder and gumbo.
We barely needed the translator as they responded: kugel, gefilte fish, borsht, brisket, and so on.
Creating a link between Post-World War II, Borsht Belt stand-up comedy and contemporary Jewish stand-up comedy, Donald Weber, in the most historicized essay in this collection, argues that Jewish stand-up comedy has significantly changed over the last thirty to forty years from embodying an antagonistic, self-hating relationship to Jewishness to engaging a more positive and affirmative attitude toward Jewishness.
We crossed Geulah Street, entered the warren--like alleys of the shabby ultra-Orthodox quarter at the top of Ahva, passed underneath washing lines heavy with black, yellow and white clothes, among rusty iron railing of neglected verandas and outside staircases, climbed up through Zikhron Moshe which was always swathed in poor Ashkenazi cooking smells, of cholent, borsht, garlic and onion and sauerkraut, and continued across to the Street of the Prophets.
Now, as a free Russian restaurant, about the only red you'll see is in the beet and cabbage borsht ($2.
Comedians like Milton Berle took the moral mensch along as they made the move from the Borsht Belt to Hollywood in the 1940s and 1950s, and the word seeped into the American mainstream.