borrow from (someone or something)

(redirected from borrowed from one)

borrow from (someone or something)

1. Literally, to use something that belongs to another person, with the intent to return it later. A noun can be used between "borrow" and "from." Because I found a date to the dance at the last minute, I just borrowed a dress and shoes from my sister. I ran out of art supplies so I had to start borrowing from Steve.
2. Of a work of some kind, to use elements from something else. That movie may be a comedy, but its plot borrows from crime films of the 1940s.
See also: borrow

borrow something from someone

to request and receive the use of something from someone. Can I borrow a hammer from you? Sorry, this hammer was borrowed from my father.
See also: borrow
References in periodicals archive ?
We are free and clear of any debt, this is money the park district borrowed from one fund to another and it would like to pay itself back for future projects.
Wearing only a wig borrowed from one of the figures and a pair of socks, her protest at Bluewater shopping centre in Kent lasted about 15 minutes before she was led away.
She displayed all for 15 minutes, naked except for a blonde wig borrowed from one of the figures - and a pair of blue socks.
The name Kiloran was borrowed from one of Colonsay's bays, Kiloran Bay.
It has issued a challenge to the ordinary person, to give a copy of How to Read a Poem: Based on the Billy Collins Poem “Introduction to Poetry” to a local English teacher—with the goal of changing what many teachers and students experience as the “grim art of poetry teaching” (a phrase they borrowed from one of their student interns) to the “delightful art of poetry teaching.
The title is borrowed from one of Johnson's songs and features many more of them.
They developed through the centuries before being written down and borrowed from one another.
The phrase authorstrator is borrowed from one of her MA students from when Helen lived in London.
Plat will already be familiar to some readers because of his prominent role in Deborah Harkness 'The Jewel House: Elizabethan London and the Scientific Revolution (2007), the title of which is actually borrowed from one of Plat's best-known works, The Jewell House of Art and Nature (1594).
Financial institutions, particularly in America, borrowed from one another to fund loans on sub-standard properties to people with poor credit ratings.
Director Roman Polanski crops up as a French cop and in a scene borrowed from one of the Bob Hope Bing Crosby Road To.
Lakers coach Phil Jackson borrowed from one of his players in describing the string of recent losses as ``haunting'' the team.
This is usually because it has been borrowed from one or more pictures by the likes of Friedrich, Claude Lorrain, or Frederic Church.
It is understood the car had been borrowed from one of the teenagers' parents.
Labour yesterday borrowed from one of Margaret Thatcher's old slogans in a bid to deal a blow to her successor Michael Howard in the run-up to June's round of European and local elections.