boom

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Related to boomed: bombed out

boom or bust

Resulting in an outcome that will either be very good or very bad. Many professional athletes face a boom or bust situation early in their career, where they are either drafted to a professional league or don't advance at all. Working in the oil fields is always boom or bust: there's either lots of work for everyone, or hardly any work for anyone.
See also: boom, bust

boom out

[for a loud sound] to sound out like thunder. His voice boomed out such that everyone could hear. An explosion boomed out and frightened us all.
See also: boom, out

boom something out

[for someone] to say something very loud; to shout. Will someone with a loud voice boom the names out? The announcer boomed out the names of the players.
See also: boom, out

lower the boom on someone

Fig. to scold or punish someone severely; to crack down on someone; to throw the book at someone. If Bob won't behave better, I'll have to lower the boom on him. The teacher lowered the boom on the whole class for misbehaving.
See also: boom, lower, on

lower the boom

  (American informal)
to suddenly stop someone doing something you do not approve of Dad lowered the boom. I have to stay in the next two weekends.
See also: boom, lower

lower the boom on

Scold harshly or punish severely; also, put a stop to something. For example, If you're caught smoking in school, the principal is bound to lower the boom on you, or The new radar equipment enabled the police to lower the boom on speeding. This expression refers to the boom of a sailboat-a long spar that extends from the mast to hold the foot of the sail. In a changing wind, the boom can swing wildly, leaving one at risk of being struck. [Slang; first half of 1900s]
See also: boom, lower, on

boom out

v.
1. To make a loud, deep sound: Rock music suddenly boomed out from the speakers.
2. To say something very loudly: She boomed her speech out to the entire building over the public address system. He boomed out the sermon in his thunderous voice.
See also: boom, out

ace boom-boom

and ace boon-coon
n. one’s good and loyal friend. (Black. Ace boon-coon is not as common as the first entry and is objected to because of coon.) Hey girlfriend, you are my ace boom-boom. Where is my old ace boon-coon, bro?
See also: ace

boom

in. to listen to music, as with a boom box. If you’re going to boom all the time, why don’t you get some headphones?

boom box

n. a portable stereo radio. (see also box, thunderbox.) Turn down that damn boom box, or I’ll kick it in.
See also: boom, box

boom sticks

n. drumsticks. (Musicians.) He always carries his boom sticks in his back pocket, and he beats on walls, radiators, desks—you name it.
See also: boom, stick
References in classic literature ?
Had there been a steady breeze it would not have been so bad, but the Ghost was rolling emptily in a long sea, and with each roll the canvas flapped and boomed and the halyards slacked and jerked taut.
Then the gag swung to the side with an abrupt swiftness, the great sail boomed like a cannon, and the three rows of reef-points slatted against the canvas like a volley of rifles.
The sound of the dinner gong boomed through the house.
If you'll only be good enough to look up my record," he boomed out in his great, clear oratorical bass, "you'll see I gave a warning only three months ago, on the occasion of the Grand Duke Romuald's visit to Paris, which was telegraphed from here to the French police, and - "
The hurricane boomed, shaking the little place, which seemed air-tight; and the light of the binnacle flickered all the time.
Buoyed by the Northeast, Chicago boomed during the 1850s, and its railroad network captured the upper Mississippi and Missouri markets.
other slicks, Alien ignited a small plastic bag of jellied gasoline and allowed it to float into the boomed oil.