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But not only is he a darling and alive and credible but his creator has also managed to invest everybody else in the book with the same kind of life.
Nay, sir," said the barber, "I too, have heard say that this is the best of all the books of this kind that have been written, and so, as something singular in its line, it ought to be pardoned.
broke off short; with the result that the shelf descended with a crash, and the books piled themselves in a heap on the floor
And he shut up the book so quickly that he caught the Other Professor's nose between the leaves, and gave it a severe pinch.
His evenings were spent at home with his books, his pictures, and his family, and usually with them alone; for, in spite of the melodramatic declarations of various English gentlemen, Melville's seclusion in his latter years, and in fact throughout his life, was a matter of personal choice.
That capital of forces which human thought had been expending in edifices, it henceforth expends in books.
Carey had so many books that he did not know them, and as he read little he forgot the odd lots he had bought at one time and another because they were cheap.
There was a delightful history of Ohio, stuffed with tales of the pioneer times, which was a good deal in the hands of us boys; and there was a book of Western Adventure, full of Indian fights and captivities, which we wore to pieces.
Stevenson's books are not for the shelf, they are for the hand; even when you lay them down, let it be on the table for the next comer.
In this book Dorothy had to take her kitten with her instead of her dog; but in the next Oz book, if I am permitted to write one, I intend to tell a good deal about Toto's further history.
The children who had learned to look for the books about Oz and who loved the stories about the gay and happy people inhabiting that favored country, were as sorry as their Historian that there would be no more books of Oz stories.
Week after week his was the credit of the unprecedented performance of having two books at the head of the list of best-sellers.
I took out first a loose bundle of ornamental cards, each containing the list of dishes at past banquets given or attended by the Major in London or Paris; next, a box full of delicately tinted quill pens (evidently a lady's gift); next, a quantity of old invitation cards; next, some dog's-eared French plays and books of the opera; next, a pocket-corkscrew, a bundle of cigarettes, and a bunch of rusty keys; lastly, a passport, a set of luggage labels, a broken silver snuff-box, two cigar-cases, and a torn map of Rome.
When we grew older, what happy hours did we not spend with our books.
We've picked our books up through the years, here and there, never buying one until we had first read it and knew that it belonged to the race of Joseph.