bombshell

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drop a brick

1. To unintentionally say or do something embarrassing, tactless, or indiscreet; to commit some social faux pas or mistake. Primarily heard in UK. I dropped a brick on our first date by ordering veal, only realizing later that he's a staunch animal rights advocate.
2. To announce a particularly surprising, alarming, or upsetting piece of news. An alternative form of "drop a bombshell." Primarily heard in US, South Africa. Mary dropped a brick when she told me she was moving to France next week. I'm about to drop a brick on my parents by telling them that I'm going to quit law school and pursue a career in art.
See also: brick, drop

drop a bomb

To reveal something that is very surprising or unexpected. Whoa, you can't just drop a bomb like that and leave—I need details about your new boyfriend! When we got a tip that the newspaper was about to drop a bomb about our candidate, we all wondered what information they could possibly have.
See also: bomb, drop

drop a bombshell

To reveal something that is very surprising or unexpected. Whoa, you can't just drop a bombshell like that and leave—I need details about your new boyfriend! When we got a tip that the newspaper was about to drop a bombshell about our candidate, we all wondered what information they could possibly have.
See also: bombshell, drop

drop a bomb(shell)

 and explode a bombshell; drop a brick
Fig. to announce shocking or startling news. They really dropped a bombshell when they announced that the mayor would resign. Friday is a good day to drop a bomb like that. It gives the business world the weekend to recover. They must choose their words very carefully when they explode a bombshell like that. They really dropped a brick when they told her the cause of her illness.
See also: bomb, drop

drop a bombshell

Make an unexpected or shattering announcement. For example, Bill dropped a bombshell when he said he was quitting. This expression, which alludes to the destruction caused by a falling bomb, dates from World War I.
See also: bombshell, drop

drop a brick

Also, drop a clanger. Say something indiscreet, commit a social gaffe. For example, John dropped a brick when he called her by his ex-wife's name. [Slang; 1920s]
See also: brick, drop

drop a bombshell

COMMON If someone drops a bombshell, they suddenly announce a piece of bad news. Next day the bombshell was dropped on the front pages of the newspapers: the company had gone into voluntary liquidation. My ex-wife is on the phone and she drops a bombshell. Sue, our daughter, is leaving the country.
See also: bombshell, drop

drop a brick

BRITISH
If you drop a brick, you say something which upsets or offends other people. After his comments on the live TV programme, Mr Freeman was immediately aware that he had dropped a political brick of the worst kind.
See also: brick, drop

drop a brick

make an indiscreet or embarrassing remark. British informal
See also: brick, drop

drop a ˈbombshell

announce something which is unexpected and usually unpleasant: It was then that he dropped the bombshell — he wasn’t planning to come with us.
See also: bombshell, drop

bomb(shell)

n. a stunning piece of news that is dropped without warning. (see also bomb.) I am still recovering from your bombshell of last evening.

drop a brick

and drop a bomb(shell)
tv. to reveal startling information. Britney came in and dropped a brick that scared us all. She dropped a bombshell when she told us she was married again.
See also: brick, drop

drop a bombshell

verb
See also: bombshell, drop

drop a bomb

verb
See also: bomb, drop

drop a brick

Informal
To make a clumsy social error.
See also: brick, drop
References in periodicals archive ?
Wiles' campaign in support of Bombshell Day is being managed by Social Media Coordinator Hannah McGee who offered the Wiles definition of a bombshell in the modern era.
List 2011, The Bombshell Summer Edition</strong></span>
In addition to these Bombshells, HollywoodEoACAOs A-listsEoACAO Paris & Nicky Hilton, along with Kim Kardashian also dazzled in diamonds by Mouawad at the fashion show and at the EoACA[pounds sterling]ApprenticeEoACA[yen] Donald Trump event.
Directed by Mark Babych, Blonde Bombshells Of 1943 received the Blue Ribbon Manchester Evening News Award for Best Production of 2006.
Send entries to: Blonde Bombshells Contest, c/o Marion McMullen, Features, Coventry Telegraph, Corporation Street, Coventry, CV1 1FP.
Despite the fact that the war was terrible, the Bombshells have to admit, `We had a wonderful time, and we can only tell other Bombshells that,'" says Mackinnon.
The TV version The Last of the Blonde Bombshells focused on recently widowed Elizabeth who is encouraged to take up her tenor saxophone again and attempts to relive her former life as a member of the Blonde Bombshells, an all-girl (with one exception) swing band during the war.
1 -- color) Leigh Swansborough, top, coaches and plays for the Orange County Bombshells.
Ruled by Mars, the planet of action, Aries bombshells such as Jayne Mansfield, below, and Mariah Carey are decisive, impulsive, spontaneous, independent and generous.
He wasn't a bad man, just a terribly humdrum one, apparently, and his death gets her to reflecting upon her squandered life, particularly before she got married, when she was the star saxophonist in a World War II-era all-girl band, the Blonde Bombshells.
Dench has also appeared in numerous television projects, including "The Last of the Blond Bombshells," with Olympia Dukakis and Sir Ian Holm.
Chariots of Fire and Alien star Ian plays a womaniser who avoids being called up by donning a dress and joining the blonde bombshells in the band.
NEWHALL - They made it home from the big wars, but it's anyone's guess how many of these grizzled guys will survive two bombshells named Joanie and Irma.
Dench will star in ``The Last of the Blonde Bombshells,'' which marks one of the first co-productions for the cable programmer with an outside producer, in this case England's Working Title Films.