bob

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bits and bobs

Sundry little items, tasks, or chores. Primarily heard in UK. I'm almost finished, I just have a few bits and bobs to do around the house before we leave. I never thought it would take me this long to pack, but I have so many bits and bobs scattered around the house!
See also: and, bit, bob

bob up

1. Literally, to move up into view above the surface of something. Otters often bob up in this part of the harbor, so it's a great place to take photographs.
2. To appear, arise, or come into being quickly and/or unexpectedly. We thought the meeting was over until several questions bobbed up from the back row. The city is deceptively small, and acquaintances often bob up at the most unexpected places.
See also: bob, up

Two Bob

1. slang A 10-pence coin. Typically capitalized. Primarily heard in UK. Grandma gave me a Two Bob for my birthday!
2. slang A 20-cent coin. Primarily heard in Australia. Grandma gave me a two bob for my birthday!
See also: bob, two

be not short of a bob or two

To be wealthy. (A "bob" is another name for a shilling.) Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I hear her father is not short of a bob or two, so I wouldn't be too worried about her future.
See also: bob, not, of, short, two

Bob's your uncle

A phrase used to emphasize how easily or quickly something can be done. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. All you have to do is combine all of the ingredients in one pot, let it cook, and then Bob's your uncle, dinner is ready!
See also: uncle

bob up

Appear suddenly or unexpectedly. For example, I didn't know anyone in the group until Harry bobbed up. This term uses the verb bob in the sense of "to bounce," a usage dating from Chaucer's day. [Late 1800s]
See also: bob, up

Bob's your uncle

BRITISH
You can say Bob's your uncle to show that something is easy and quick to achieve. You just tag along with a teacher for a while, and in a year, Bob's your uncle, you are a teacher too. If the boiler ever gets too hot, the safety valve releases all the excess steam, and Bob's your uncle. No problem. Note: This expression dates back to a political scandal in Britain in 1886. The Prime Minister Robert Cecil gave his nephew the position of Chief Secretary for Ireland, and many people criticized him for this. The name `Bob' is short for `Robert'.
See also: uncle

bob and weave

make rapid bodily movements up and down and from side to side.
See also: and, bob, weave

Bob's your uncle

everything is fine; problem solved. British informal
Bob is a familiar form of the name Robert . The origin of the phrase is often said to be in the controversial appointment in 1887 of the young Arthur Balfour to the important post of Chief Secretary for Ireland by his uncle Lord Salisbury , whose first name was Robert . The problem with this explanation is that the phrase is not recorded until the 1930s.
1996 Colin Bateman Of Wee Sweetie Mice and Men I couldn't believe how easy it was to get. Just walked into a shop, signed a piece of paper, and Bob's your uncle.
See also: uncle

true as Bob (or God)

absolutely true. South African informal
See also: bob, true

(and) Bob’s your ˈuncle

(British English, informal) often used after explaining how to do something, solve a problem, etc. to emphasize how easy it is: To make the alarm go off at the right time, you just press this button, set the clock, and Bob’s your uncle! Bob is a short form of the name ‘Robert’. This phrase might refer to the prime minister Robert Cecil. In 1887 he unexpectedly decided to give an important government position to his nephew, who was not considered a very important politician.
See also: uncle

bob up

v.
To come to the surface quickly, especially after being underneath for a short time: I didn't think anyone else was swimming in the pond, but then someone's head bobbed up right in front of me.
See also: bob, up

been bobbing for fries

phr. [has] a really ugly face. (As if badly burned.) Look at that face. Been bobbing for fries, I guess.
See also: been, bob, fries
References in classic literature ?
The nephew of one of the standard Victorian novelists, Mainhall bobbed about among the various literary cliques of London and its outlying suburbs, careful to lose touch with none of them.
The shaggy man bowed, too, and Button-Bright bobbed his head and said "Hello.
He shouted and roared and bobbed his shock of red wig until the audience broke out in excited applause.
I never knew such obstinate things, for they would n't soften, though they danced about in the boiling water, and bobbed against the cover as if they were doing their best.
She bobbed a frightened curtsey as Sir Nigel swept his velvet hat from his head and reined up his great charger.
He hopped and bobbed clumsily along on his injured ankle, throwing stones and screaming hoarsely at times; at other times hopping and bobbing silently along, picking himself up grimly and patiently when he fell, or rubbing his eyes with his hand when the giddiness threatened to overpower him.