boardinghouse reach

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boardinghouse reach

A long, awkward reach across a table (and other people) to take food, rather than asking for it to be passed over. It is considered rude in polite company and thus likened to manners one might find in a boarding house. What have I told you about using that boardinghouse reach at the dinner table? Pardon my boardinghouse reach—I'll try not to spill anything on you!
See also: reach

boardinghouse reach

Reaching across fellow diners for food instead of asking them to pass it. For example, At holiday meals when the whole family is gathered, Dad always scolds at least one child for his boardinghouse reach . This term alludes to the formerly common boardinghouse practice of seating all the residents at one large table and to the rudeness of those who simply reached across others to help themselves. Heard less often today, it is not quite obsolete. [c. 1900]
See also: reach
References in periodicals archive ?
Gamber shows that incessant complaints about boardinghouse food reflected not the actual quality of the food (which was probably similar to most food served in private homes, and was directly related to the "quality" or expense of the house) but rather the resentment of clerks faced with declining prospects for upward mobility.
Having finally come to an agreement about the facts of the past they can conclude that Martha came to the boardinghouse for the specific purpose of asking help from Bynum.
According to census manuscript records of 1910, most of the Chinese in Tonopah were laundrymen or cooks, with a few in scattered occupations, such as boardinghouse owners, house servants, vegetable peddlers, wood packers, restaurant owners, grocers, merchants, and laborers.
Fortunately, another tenant of the boardinghouse, Marie-Helene from Guadeloupe, who works at the Boucicaut Hospital, gets her a job there as a cleaning woman.
Another form of lodging was the boardinghouse occupied by single male Chinese labourers who worked in canneries or on the railroad in summer and returned to town when jobless in winter.
He said the home was a two-family apartment house years ago, but now it appears to be a boardinghouse, with tenants renting rooms and sharing bathrooms and a kitchen on each floor.
IN Sacramento, California, police find a body buried in the lawn of 60-year-old boardinghouse landlady Dorothea Puente.
THE STORY: When the strong-willed Clara Driscoll, who narrates the novel, is left a young widow, she goes to live in a bohemian boardinghouse and returns to work in the women's department at Tiffany Studios.
Brewer''s Dictionary of Phrase and Fable suggests the police wagon was named after a fearsome lady called Maria Lee who kept a boardinghouse in Boston in the 1820s.
During the passing weeks and months, as she travels to her boardinghouse, her tailor, and her fellow prostitutes for piano lessons and to learn the sauciest of French vocabulary, she is joined by a rich cast of characters differentiated by more than age and class.
While Fred searches for a boardinghouse in the city, he observes drunken adults and impoverished children lining the streets.
It is not until the next shot sequence--in which the Bangladeshi workers carry the mattress upstairs to their decrepit boardinghouse and unfold it on the floor, revealing an unconscious body within it--that we realize, retrospectively, the mysterious figure crumpled up at the side of the road was Hsiao-kang.
It is 1944 and Miss Arbutus Ward, spinster owner of the town boardinghouse, takes her in.
So Goody and childhood friend Sally Ford found a hulking old boardinghouse in the Nye Beach neighborhood of Newport.
In 1946, she married a young man she met at a boardinghouse where she was living in on Norton Avenue - the street, she points out, where the body in the Black Dahlia murder was found the following year.