bluff

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you can't bluff a bluffer

It is very difficult to fool someone who is experienced in the ways of fooling other people. I know Bill thinks he can keep up with these star poker players, but you can't bluff a bluffer—they'll see through him for sure!
See also: bluff

bluff (someone) into (something)

To mislead someone into doing something, holding some position, or making some decision, often by making a false promise or lying about the purported consequences or result. I used to be able to bluff my little sister into cleaning my room, but she's wary now since I never actually give her the candy I promise. Jeff tried to bluff management into giving him a raise by claiming he had several job offers elsewhere.
See also: bluff

bluff (someone) out of (something)

To mislead someone in order to take something from them. I can't believe Jon bluffed me out of ten bucks by claiming he was collecting money for charity.
See also: bluff, of, out

bluff (one's) way into (something)

To gain access to a particular place or thing through deceit. We tried to bluff our way into the party, but we were immediately recognized as freshmen and told to leave.
See also: bluff, way

bluff (one's) way out of (something)

To escape a negative situation through deceit. My brother is a good liar, but even he couldn't bluff his way out of that speeding ticket. I bluffed my way out of taking the test by saying I had a bad headache.
See also: bluff, of, out, way

call (one's) bluff

1. To challenge someone to act on their threat or prove that their claim or boast is true, when one believes they are making a false claim or idle threat (i.e. bluffing). He insisted that he could run faster than me, but when I called his bluff, he suddenly said he had to go home.
2. To disprove a bluff. Whereas the first usage simply indicates a challenge, this usage indicates that the challenge resulted in the disproval. I don't know why he keeps making these outrageous claims. I've been calling his bluff for years and making him look like a fool.
See also: bluff, call

bluff (one's) way

To achieve or accomplish something through deceit or by making a false display. (Usually followed by "into," "out of," or "through.") We tried to bluff our way into the party, but we were immediately recognized as freshmen and told to leave. My brother is a good liar, but even he couldn't bluff his way out of that speeding ticket. I managed to bluff my way through the presentation with a lot of vague ideas and corporate buzz words.
See also: bluff, way

bluff (one's) way through (something)

To use guesswork or a false display as a means of completing or accomplishing something. I managed to bluff my way through the presentation with a lot of vague ideas and corporate buzz words. I hadn't studied for the test, so I just bluffed my way through it.
See also: bluff, through, way

bluff one's way out (of something)

to get out of a difficult situation by deception or cunning. I will try to bluff my way out of this mess.
See also: bluff, out, way

bluff someone into something

to mislead or deceive someone into doing something. Are you trying to bluff me into giving up without a fight? I won't be bluffed into revealing the whereabouts of the safe.
See also: bluff

bluff someone out (of something)

to get something away from someone through deception. We bluffed her out of her share of the pie. I bluffed Liz out of her rightful turn to drive.
See also: bluff, out

call someone's bluff

to demand that someone prove a claim or is not being deceptive. All right, I'll call your bluff. Show me you can do it! Tom said, "You've made me really angry, and I'll punch you if you come any closer!" "Go ahead," said Bill, calling his bluff.
See also: bluff, call

call someone's bluff

Expose someone's deception, invite a showdown, as in I don't believe they have enough capital; I'm going to call their bluff. This term comes from poker, where bluffing (pretending) that one has better cards than one's opponents is an intrinsic part of the game, and calling someone's bluff means forcing them to show their cards. By the late 1800s it was being applied to other enterprises. Also see show one's hand.
See also: bluff, call

call someone's bluff

COMMON If someone has made a threat and you call their bluff, you tell them to do what they are threatening to do, knowing that they probably will not do it. Mr Lukanov warned that he would deal severely with any protest actions in the universities. Now that the students have called his bluff, it remains to be seen what Mr Lukanov can do. The Socialists have finally decided to call the opposition's bluff, and it looks as if they have succeeded. Note: In poker (= a card game), a player who is bluffing is playing as though they have good cards when in fact they have bad cards. If another player calls the first player's bluff, they increase their stake (=the amount of money that is risked) to the required amount and ask the first player to show their cards.
See also: bluff, call

call someone's bluff

challenge someone to carry out a stated intention, in the expectation of being able to expose it as a false pretence.
In the game of poker (which was formerly also known by the name of bluff ), calling someone's bluff meant making an opponent show their hand in order to reveal that its value was weaker than their heavy betting suggested.
See also: bluff, call

call somebody’s ˈbluff

give somebody the chance to do what they are threatening to do, because you believe they will not or cannot do it: Next time she offers her resignation, they’ll call her bluff and accept it.
If you call somebody’s bluff in the game of poker, you force them to show their cards.
See also: bluff, call

bluff (one's) way

To deceive someone or accomplish something by making a false display.
See also: bluff, way

call (someone's) bluff

To demand proof for or respond in a challenging way to the claims or threats of another that one presumes to be false.
See also: bluff, call
References in periodicals archive ?
The bluffers tend to be the ones who'll happily quote a famous part of a film, but can't tell you when it happens in the film, or else they'll quote a line, but get it slightly wrong.
He revealed it is easy for bluffers to smooth their way on to discussion programmes.
The best regional players then get to pit their wits against fellow full house hunters and bluffers to qualify for the national final at Dusk Till Dawn.
Bluffers guides to the Ashes: pages 28-29 Ashes special: sport pullout
All this week, though, we've been hearing from people who pretend they do - bluffers.
A quarter of men (25 per cent) admit to regularly bluffing about their ability under the bonnet suggesting that they are more car bluffers than car buffs.
You must know by now that most politicians and their cronies are either duffers or bluffers.
The research revealed the nation is made up of Techno Tinkerers (69 per cent), Techno No Ways (14 per cent), Techno Pros (12 per cent) and Techno Bluffers (five per cent).
YOU'RE FULL OF IT enables players to seamlessly connect to the Internet for the live game show version, where they can compete with bluffers worldwide.
Bluffers are too proud to ask the kids for help and suffer from gadget-induced anxiety.
So in a spirit of communion with you, loyal reader, who may not have the time but still has the inclination, here's a short-cut bluffers guide to the runners and riders of 2011.
I think that says a lot about the ability of the rest and it says something about the gullibility of the average fan who believes all the bull surrounding these bluffers who bleed every penny out of the game and only perform when they feel like it.
Only by reading their rivals' body language and behaviour can they hope to judge whether their opponents are pokerface bluffers or a genuine contenders who could jeopardise their place in the final.
On the contrary,it is rural life that will have to change to fit the national conscience,and not to accommodate the outmoded hobbies of toffs, duffers and bluffers.
There were the professional bluffers such as the one who claimed: "I am a personal friend of several TV personalities, who would be happy to act as referees.