bluff

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you can't bluff a bluffer

It is very difficult to fool someone who is experienced in the ways of fooling other people. I know Bill thinks he can keep up with these star poker players, but you can't bluff a bluffer—they'll see through him for sure!
See also: bluff

bluff (someone) into (something)

To mislead someone into doing something, holding some position, or making some decision, often by making a false promise or lying about the purported consequences or result. I used to be able to bluff my little sister into cleaning my room, but she's wary now since I never actually give her the candy I promise. Jeff tried to bluff management into giving him a raise by claiming he had several job offers elsewhere.
See also: bluff

bluff (someone) out of (something)

To mislead someone in order to take something from them. I can't believe Jon bluffed me out of ten bucks by claiming he was collecting money for charity.
See also: bluff, of, out

bluff (one's) way into (something)

To gain access to a particular place or thing through deceit. We tried to bluff our way into the party, but we were immediately recognized as freshmen and told to leave.
See also: bluff, way

bluff (one's) way out of (something)

To escape a negative situation through deceit. My brother is a good liar, but even he couldn't bluff his way out of that speeding ticket. I bluffed my way out of taking the test by saying I had a bad headache.
See also: bluff, of, out, way

call (one's) bluff

1. To challenge someone to act on their threat or prove that their claim or boast is true, when one believes they are making a false claim or idle threat (i.e. bluffing). He insisted that he could run faster than me, but when I called his bluff, he suddenly said he had to go home.
2. To disprove a bluff. Whereas the first usage simply indicates a challenge, this usage indicates that the challenge resulted in the disproval. I don't know why he keeps making these outrageous claims. I've been calling his bluff for years and making him look like a fool.
See also: bluff, call

bluff one's way out (of something)

to get out of a difficult situation by deception or cunning. I will try to bluff my way out of this mess.
See also: bluff, out, way

bluff someone into something

to mislead or deceive someone into doing something. Are you trying to bluff me into giving up without a fight? I won't be bluffed into revealing the whereabouts of the safe.
See also: bluff

bluff someone out (of something)

to get something away from someone through deception. We bluffed her out of her share of the pie. I bluffed Liz out of her rightful turn to drive.
See also: bluff, out

call someone's bluff

to demand that someone prove a claim or is not being deceptive. All right, I'll call your bluff. Show me you can do it! Tom said, "You've made me really angry, and I'll punch you if you come any closer!" "Go ahead," said Bill, calling his bluff.
See also: bluff, call

call your bluff

to make someone do what they said they will do He said he would help, and now his opponents have called his bluff and asked him to provide the funds.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of calling a bluff in a card game (forcing someone to show the cards they hold)
See also: bluff, call

bluff your way

to deceive others to get what you want Some teens used false IDs to bluff their way into casinos.
Usage notes: usually followed by a phrase starting with through, out of, or into, as in the example
See also: bluff, way

call somebody's bluff

to make someone prove that what they are saying is true, or to make someone prove that they will really do what they say they will do, because you do not believe them
Usage notes: If you are playing a card game and you call someone's bluff, you force them to show you the cards they have.
Alice called his bluff and dared him to tell everyone what he knew about her.
See also: bluff, call

call someone's bluff

Expose someone's deception, invite a showdown, as in I don't believe they have enough capital; I'm going to call their bluff. This term comes from poker, where bluffing (pretending) that one has better cards than one's opponents is an intrinsic part of the game, and calling someone's bluff means forcing them to show their cards. By the late 1800s it was being applied to other enterprises. Also see show one's hand.
See also: bluff, call

bluff (one's) way

To deceive someone or accomplish something by making a false display.
See also: bluff, way

call (someone's) bluff

To demand proof for or respond in a challenging way to the claims or threats of another that one presumes to be false.
See also: bluff, call