blues

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Related to bluesy: bluesier

cry the blues

1. Literally, to sing blues music or in that style. There was this old man crying the blues at the bar last night; it was a really moving bit of music.
2. By extension, to complain, whine, or express grief, especially as a means of gaining sympathy from others. Many people will cry the blues over trivial inconveniences, while millions of others silently suffer real hardships every day.
See also: blues, cry

have the blues

To be or feel generally sad or melancholy. I don't know what it is, but I find I always have the blues on Sundays.
See also: blues, have

baby blues

1. A usually brief period of sadness, anxiety, and mood swings experienced by a large percentage of women after giving birth. When I had the baby blues after having my first child, I would find myself crying without knowing why.
2. Blue eyes, especially those that are light blue. I just had to ask for Sean's number after I got a glimpse of his baby blues—I'd never seen such striking eyes before!
See also: baby, blues

sing the blues

1. Literally, to sing blues music or in that style. There was this old man singing the blues at the bar last night—it was a really moving bit of music.
2. By extension, to complain, whine, or express grief, especially as a means of gaining sympathy from others. Many people will sing the blues over trivial inconveniences, while millions of others silently suffer real hardships every day.
See also: blues, sing

blues and twos

An emergency vehicle, such as an ambulance or police car, that has blue flashing lights and a siren that sounds two notes. Primarily heard in UK. Pull the car over and let the blues and twos pass.
See also: and, blues, two

*blues

 
1. sadness; a mood of depression. (*Typically: get ~; have ~.) You'll have to excuse Bill. He's getting the blues thinking about Jane. I get the blues every time I hear that song.
2. a traditional style of popular music characterized by lyrics expressing hardship, lost love, etc. Buddy had been singing the blues ever since the Depression.

have the blues

Also, feel blue. Feel depressed or sad, as in After seeing the old house in such bad shape, I had the blues for weeks, or Patricia tends to feel blue around the holidays. The noun blues, meaning "low spirits," was first recorded in 1741 and may come from blue devil, a 17th-century term for a baleful demon, or from the adjective blue meaning "sad," a usage first recorded in Chaucer's Complaint of Mars (c. 1385). The idiom may have been reinforced by the notion that anxiety produces a livid skin color. Also see blue funk.
See also: blues, have

blues and twos

the siren and blue flashing lights of an emergency-service vehicle. British informal
The twos refers to the vehicles' two-tone siren.
2003 Bolton Evening News They will go out with local officers and really learn the craft of being a beat bobby rather than just going out in blues and twos.
See also: and, blues, two
References in periodicals archive ?
From a musicological standpoint, a bluesy sound exists outside of the specific tones associated with Western musical scales.
Using simple melodies, pleasing harmonies and bluesy guitar solos, the Garzas, singing in Spanish and English, have churned out two albums' worth of catchy rockers and ballads.
Greenwood's voice affects an eerie robotic vibrato in places, while on other songs it sounds gentle, wistful, or bluesy.
New stuff from the Black Keys, down-home and bluesy.
From the opening bluesy sway of River in the Pines, Fisher's extraordinarily soulful voice was to the fore, crooning and growling in equal measure.
The series of light, bluesy tap pieces--backed up by a live jazz trio--had a carefree, improvisational energy.
Other highlights include Duke Ellington's soulful tune "Prelude To A Kiss," Gene Harris' bluesy rendition of "Everything Happens To Me," and Charlie Byrd & Ken Peplowski's "Corcovado.
New to the tracklist are old school R&B rabble rouser What Does It Take and the bluesy country swoon of Not Like Loving You.
The music ranges from bluegrass to bluesy sing-alongs, and the energetic rhymes combined with parent-child bonding are sure to stimulate cognitive, physical and social development.
Amid their highway adventures, which include Gypsy's fling with a runaway Amish boy and Clive's romp with a closeted frat rat, the two find themselves in a nowhere bar watching Bambi do a bluesy rendition of "When Surely Gets Blue.
Most of the energetic set was like a modern country hoedown soundtrack, with songs like Miniskirt and Pack Of Nails full of sweet countrified harmonies and rough and ready bluesy guitar licks.
Don't sleep on Tim Kerr--he's producing some killer stuff and also making his own music with a deeply-entrenched DIY philosophy Look for the bluesy Our Friends are Friends on Estrus.
The affectionate vaudeville and nightclub treatment of, count 'em, thirty-two Kern songs, was, like many of the programs this season, too long, but there were some brilliant segments, particularly Barker and Jeffrey Stanton's pas de deux for "The Wishing Well," Derieux's bluesy dancing of "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man," and Kaori Nakamura and Vladislav Bourakov's rendering of the equally jazzy choreography for "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes.
Moonshine kicks things off with a bluesy riff, followed by the raw title track, both powered by the drums of our own Bev Bevan.
Partial to old-timey shuffle beats with rich, bluesy bottoms, this fine trio brings forth infernal tales of confinement and escape that you can dance to, but also makes room for inspiring psalms of love and enlightenment.