blown


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be blown away

To be thoroughly impressed, overwhelmed, or excited by something. I am blown away by the show of support from everyone. I was blown away by how good that movie was!
See also: away, blown

blown (all) out of proportion

Exaggerated or magnified beyond the true scale or truth of the matter. It was just a minor tremor, not even a proper earthquake, but the media has it blown all out of proportion. These reports on the crime rate are blown out of proportion, if you ask me.
See also: blown, of, out, proportion

be blown to smithereens

To be blown up or broken apart into tiny, fragmentary pieces. "Smithereens," first appearing in English in 1829 as "smiddereens," is likely derived from the Irish word "smidirín" or "smidiríní," meaning "fragment." I wish I could still go visit our old family home, but it's already been blown to smithereens by the demolition crew. The village was blown to smithereens by the typhoon's gale-force winds.
See also: blown, smithereens

blow away

1. Of the wind, to blow someone or something away from its current location. Our trashcans were blown away in that bad storm, and we finally found them down the street in our neighbor's yard. I was almost blown away on my walk to the library because it's so windy out!
2. To thoroughly impress, overwhelm, or excite. In this usage, a noun can be used between "blow" and "away." The show of support from everyone just blew me away. I was blown away by how good that movie was!
3. slang To kill someone, especially with gunfire or an explosive device. Ray blew away the informant, just as the boss told him to.
4. To defeat an opponent easily and/or by a wide margin. In this usage, a noun can used between "blow" and "away." The final score was 17-1? Wow, we really blew that team away! I have a feeling the top-ranked team is just going to blow away any opponent they face.
See also: away, blow

blown away

Thoroughly impressed, overwhelmed, or excited by something. I am blown away by the show of support from everyone. I was blown away by how good that movie was!
See also: away, blown

blow down

Of the wind, to blow something to the ground. That wind today blew down all of the clothes I'd hung on the clothesline. Your hanging flower pots might get blown down in this storm.
See also: blow, down

blow off the map

To obliterate. A noun can be used between "blow" and "off." Many buildings were blown off the map during the siege. The dictator threatened to blow our country off the map.
See also: blow, map, off

blow out

1. verb To extinguish something (typically a flame) with some form of air, such as breath or wind. Make a wish and blow out your birthday candles! That huge gust of wind blew out all our tiki torches.
2. verb To break or burst suddenly. I almost lost control of the car when one of the tires blew out on the highway.
3. verb, slang To kill someone, typically with gunfire. Ray blew out the informant, just as the boss told him to.
4. verb To defeat an opponent easily and/or by a wide margin. In this usage, a noun can be used between "blow" and "out." The final score was 17-1? Wow, we really blew that team out! I have a feeling the top-ranked team is just going to blow out any opponent they face.
5. verb To return to a state of calm after turmoil by something's own workings. Don't worry, the storm will blow out eventually.
6. verb To break or explode due to excessive pressure or force. The vibration of that opera singer's high note blew out a window!
7. noun An intense argument or disagreement. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word. Our neighbors had a real blowout last night—we could hear them screaming at each other through the walls.
8. noun A big, elaborate party. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word. Come on, we need to have one last blowout before we graduate from college!
9. noun A method of styling one's hair with a blow dryer and a round brush. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word. To ensure that my hair would look good for the wedding, I stopped at the salon for a blowout.
10. noun An instance of a tire suddenly bursting while the vehicle is being driven. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word. I almost lost control of the car when I got a blowout on the highway.
11. noun The unchecked, often accidental, release of a substance, such as oil or gas. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word. What effects did the oil blowout have on marine life?
12. noun An easy victory and/or one by a wide margin. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word. The final score was 17-1? Wow, that's really a blowout!
13. noun slang An instance of excessive fecal matter not being contained by a diaper. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word. I'm sorry I'm late, the baby had a blowout, so I had to give her a bath before dropping her at the sitter's.
See also: blow, out

blow (something) out of (all) proportion

To make something seem more important, negative, or significant than it really is; to exaggerate something or focus unncessary attention on something. I'm sure he didn't mean anything by that comment—don't blow it out of proportion. Of course she's mad at me because I didn't call her back—you can always count on my mom to blow something out of all proportion!
See also: blow, of, out, proportion

blow over

1. Literally, of the wind, to topple something or blow it to the ground. In this usage, a noun can be used between "blow" and "over." Our daughter's playhouse was blown over in that bad storm, and it took two of us to get it upright again! That gusty wind almost blew me over on my walk here!
2. To return to a state of calm after turmoil. Don't worry, the storm will blow over eventually. When you think the tension between mom and grandma will blow over?
See also: blow

blow (something) sky-high

1. Literally, to destroy something through an explosion. The tanks blew the enemy fortress sky-high.
2. To undermine or negate something completely. I thought I had finally discovered the problem with our experiment, but, when we tested it, the results blew my theory sky-high. Bob was considered for the promotion, but he blew that idea sky-high when he came in late to work each day this week.
See also: blow

blow smoke

1. Literally, to expel smoke from one's mouth, as while smoking a cigarette, cigar, etc. Ew, don't blow smoke in my face!
2. To smoke marijuana. My little brother has no aspirations of going to college—he'd much rather blow smoke with his friends all day.
3. To intentionally mislead. I think they're blowing smoke about giving regular raises to their employees—I couldn't find any evidence to support that claim.
See also: blow, smoke

blow the gaff

slang To talk about or reveal a private or secret matter. Primarily heard in UK. I can't believe you blew the gaff and talked about the plans for her surprise party right to her face! Don't tell your little brother anything you want to keep secret because he'll definitely blow the gaff.
See also: blow, gaff

blow the lid off (something)

To expose something to the public, often something scandalous or deceptive. That company's stock price plummeted after the media blew the lid off the CEO's embezzlement scandal.
See also: blow, lid, off

blow (someone or something) to bits

To explode or otherwise destroy something into tiny, fragmentary pieces. The demolition crew came in and blew the house to bits. The small band of rebels didn't stand a chance; they were blown to bits as soon as the loyalists had them in sight.
See also: bit, blow

blow up

1. verb To destroy something through an explosion. They plan to blow up that old apartment building and replace it with shops and luxury condos.
2. verb To explode something. Our poor dog is hiding under the bed because our neighbors celebrate the Fourth of July by blowing up tons of fireworks.
3. verb To inflate. Can you help me blow up these balloons for the birthday party? I need to blow up one of my bike tires—it's a little flat right now.
4. verb To increase in size. If you can't read the text at this size, I can blow it up a little bit more. For my mom's birthday, I blew up that picture of our entire family at my graduation and gave it to her as a gift.
5. verb To lose one's temper in a display of anger. I'm sorry that I blew up at you like that—work is so frustrating right now that I have no patience left when I get home. Don't blow up at me—I didn't make that mistake!
6. verb To become very popular, often suddenly. I used to think I was the only one who liked that band, but they're really popular at my school now—it's like they blew up overnight.
7. verb To make something seem more important, negative, or significant than it really is; to exaggerate something or focus unncessary attention on something. In this usage, a noun is often used between "blow" and "up." I'm sure he didn't mean anything by that comment—don't blow it up too much. Of course she's mad at me for not calling her back—you can always count on my mom to blow something up!
8. verb To begin suddenly, as of a storm or other windy weather condition. The storm blew up so quickly that I didn't have a chance to move the patio furniture before it started pouring rain.
9. verb To fail or fall apart. My plans of being productive this weekend blew up when I got really sick on Friday night.
10. verb, slang To receive a lot of phone calls and/or text messages in a short period of time. This phrase typically uses the form "blowing up." A: "Wow, you're really blowing up right now." B: "Ugh, it's just this stupid group text. The other people in it text each other every five seconds!" The senator's phones were blowing up as his constituents called en masse to urge him to vote against the confirmation.
11. noun An intense argument or disagreement. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word. Our neighbors had a real blowup last night—we could hear them screaming at each other through the walls.
12. noun A larger version of something, such as a photo. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word. For her birthday, I gave my mom a poster-size blowup of that picture of our entire family from my graduation.
13. noun A failure or collapse. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word. The blowup of the management team was another big setback for the fledgling company.
See also: blow, up

blow (something) wide open

1. To expose something scandalous or deceptive. That company's stock price plummeted after the media blew the CEO's embezzlement scandal wide open. An anonymous tip to the police is what blew the theft ring wide open.
2. To make the outcome of a competition hard to predict. Having so many outstanding teams in the playoffs this year has really blown the field wide open.
See also: blow, open, wide

blow away

[for something light] to be carried away by the wind. The leaves blew away on the autumn winds. My papers blew away!
See also: away, blow

blow over

Fig. [for something] to diminish; to subside. (As with a storm or a temper tantrum.) Her display of temper finally blew over. The storm will blow over soon, I hope.
See also: blow

blow someone away

 
1. Sl. [for something shocking or exciting] to overwhelm a person; to excite a person very much. The amount of the check blew me away. The loud noise from the concert blew me away.
2. Sl. to murder someone, usually by gunfire. Mr. Big ordered Lefty to blow Max away. Max tried to blow Lefty away.
See also: away, blow

blow someone or something away

[for the wind] to carry someone or something away. The wind almost blew her away. It nearly blew away all the houses.
See also: away, blow

blow someone or something down

[for a rush of air] to knock someone or something over. The wind blew Chuck down. The tornado blew down many buildings.
See also: blow, down

blow someone or something over

[for the wind] to move strongly and upset someone or something. The wind almost blew us over. The tornado blew the shed over.
See also: blow

blow someone or something up

 
1. Lit. to destroy someone or something by explosion. The terrorists blew the building up at midday. They blew up the bridge.
2. Fig. to exaggerate something [good or bad] about someone or something. I hope no one blows the story up. The media always blows up reports of celebrity behavior. The press blew the story up unnecessarily.
See also: blow, up

blow someone out

Sl. to kill someone, especially with gunshots. (Fixed order.) Lefty set out to blow Max out once and for all. Lefty wanted to blow Max out too.
See also: blow, out

blow someone over

 
1. Lit. [for the wind or an explosion] to knock someone over. The force of the wind nearly blew me over. The wind blew over the old tree.
2. Fig. to surprise or astound someone. (Fixed order.) Her announcement just blew me over. The whole event just blew me over.
See also: blow

blow something out

to extinguish a flame with a puff of breath. I blew the candle out. I blew out the candles one by one.
See also: blow, out

blow something up

 
1. to inflate something. He didn't have enough breath to blow the balloon up. They all blew up their own balloons.
2. to have a photograph enlarged. How big can you blow this picture up? I will blow up this snapshot and frame it.
See also: blow, up

blow up

 
1. Lit. [for something] to explode. The bomb might have blown up if the children had tried to move it. The firecracker blew up.
2. Fig. to burst into anger. I just knew you'd blow up. So she blew up. Why should that affect you so much?
3. Fig. an angry outburst; a fight. (Usually blowup.) After the third blowup, she left him. One blowup after another from you. Control your temper!
4. Fig. an enlarged version of a photograph, map, chart, etc. (Usually blowup.) Here's a blowup of the scene of the crime. Kelly sent a blowup of their wedding picture to all her relatives.
5. Fig. the ruination of something; the collapse of something. (Usually blowup.) The blowup in the financial world has ruined my chances for early retirement. After the blowup at the company, the top managers called one another to compare notes.
6. Fig. to fall apart or get ruined. The whole project blew up. It will have to be canceled. All my planning was blown up this afternoon.
7. [for a storm] to arrive accompanied by the blowing of the wind. A terrible storm blew up while we were in the movie theater. I was afraid that a rainstorm was blowing up.
See also: blow, up

blown (up)

Sl. intoxicated. I guess I'm a little too blown up to drive.

blow somebody away

also blow away somebody
1. to cause someone great pleasure or surprise knock somebody off their feet Everyone I tell that story to, I mean everyone, is just blown away. That new exhibit of ancient gold objects at the museum is so amazing, it will blow you away! Related vocabulary: blow your mind
2. to defeat someone completely The Warriors ended an 11-game losing streak by blowing away the Boston Beans 101-87.
3. (slang) to kill someone It's basically a dull movie except for the scene where Francie gets to blow away some bad guys. You know, it probably won't be an accident that blows me away but some health problem. Related vocabulary: blow somebody's brains out
See also: away, blow

blow out somebody

also blow somebody out
to defeat someone completely Sometimes you play really badly and get blown out.
See also: blow, out

blow out something

also blow something out
to make something stop working I turned on my new television and blew out the picture tube.
See also: blow, out

blow over

to be forgotten because something else happens This scandal will never blow over unless something even worse happens.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of blow over (to be pushed down by wind)
See also: blow

blow up

to become suddenly very angry He may blow up when he finds out how much money I spent.
See also: blow, up

blow up something

also blow something up
to make something larger Could you blow this picture up to 8 by 10?
See also: blow, up

blow smoke

to deceive others He wanted everyone to believe he had a lot of experience, but I think he was just blowing smoke.
See also: blow, smoke

blow smoke

  (American)
to say things that are not true in order to make yourself or something you are involved with seem better than it is The team put on an unbelievable performance. I'm not just blowing smoke - they were great.
See also: blow, smoke

blow the gaff

  (British old-fashioned, informal)
to cause trouble for someone by letting other people know something that they were trying to keep secret (often + on ) They killed Green because he was about to blow the gaff on their drug dealing.
See also: blow, gaff

[blow/bomb/wipe etc.] something/swh off the map

to destroy something completely, especially with bombs At least eight Spanish warships were blown off the map.
See also: blow, map, off

blow away

1. Kill, especially by gunshot or explosion. For example, The unit reported that the whole village was blown away. This usage became particularly widespread in the 1960s, during the Vietnam War. [Slang; early 1990s]
2. Overcome easily; defeat decisively. For example, Ann said the test would be easy; she would just blow it away, or Jim was sure his crew could blow away their opponents. [Slang; 1960s] Also see blow off, def. 5.
3. Impress greatly, overwhelm with surprise, delight, or shock, as in That music really blew me away. [Slang; c. 1970] Also see blow one's mind.
See also: away, blow

blow out

1. Extinguish, especially a flame. For example, The wind blew out the candles very quickly. [1300s]
2. Lose force or cease entirely, as in The storm will soon blow itself out and move out to sea. Also see blow over.
3. Burst or rupture suddenly, as in This tire is about to blow out. This usage alludes to the escape of air under pressure. [Early 1900s]
4. Also, blow out of the water. Defeat decisively, as in With a great new product and excellent publicity, we could blow the competition out of the water . This term originally was used in mid-19th-century naval warfare, where it meant to blast or shoot another vessel to pieces. It later was transferred to athletic and other kinds of defeat. [Slang; mid-1900s]
See also: blow, out

blow over

Pass away, subside. For example, The storm will blow over by afternoon, or After a couple of years the scandal will blow over. This term, with its analogy to storm clouds that pass over an area without descending, dates from about 1600.
See also: blow

blow up

1. Explode or cause to explode. For example, The squadron was told to blow up the bridge, or Jim was afraid his experiment would blow up the lab. The term is sometimes amplified, as in blow up in one's face. [Late 1500s]
2. Lose one's temper, as in I'm sorry I blew up at you. Mark Twain used this metaphor for an actual explosion in one of his letters (1871): "Redpath tells me to blow up. Here goes!" [Colloquial; second half of 1800s]
3. Inflate, fill with air, as in If you don't blow up those tires you're sure to have a flat. [Early 1400s]
4. Enlarge, especially a photograph, as in If we blow up this picture, you'll be able to make out the expressions on their faces. [c. 1930]
5. Exaggerate the importance of something or someone, as in Tom has a tendency to blow up his own role in the affair. This term applies the "inflate" of def. 3 to importance. It was used in this sense in England from the early 1500s to the 1700s, but then became obsolete there although it remains current in America.
6. Collapse, fail, as in Graduate-student marriages often blow up soon after the couple earn their degrees. [Slang; mid-1800s]
See also: blow, up

blow away

v.
1. To be carried or pushed away by the force of moving air: I left the newspaper on the table and it blew away.
2. To carry or push something away by the force of moving air: The wind blows the fallen leaves away. The storm blew away all the laundry from the clothesline.
3. Slang To affect someone intensely in mind or emotion: Your wonderful new poems really blow me away. Their amazing performance blew away every member of the audience.
4. Slang To kill someone, especially with a firearm: The gang entered their rival's hideout, ready to blow away everyone. The thieves threatened to blow me away if I didn't tell them where I hid the money.
5. Slang To defeat someone or something decisively: The confident chess player blew away every challenger. The visiting soccer team was much better than our team and easily blew us away.
See also: away, blow

blow out

v.
1. To extinguish something with the breath or a gust of air: The child blew out the candles on the birthday cake. The lamp was flickering, so I blew it out.
2. To be extinguished by the breath or a gust of air: If the wind picks up, our fire will blow out.
3. To remove or burst something with powerful or violent force: The blast blew out all the windows on the block. The sudden pressure blew the pipes out.
4. To cause something to burst: The glass on the road blew out our tires. A nail got caught under the inner tube and blew it out.
5. To burst: The front tire blew out when we were driving down the road.
6. To cause something to stop functioning suddenly. Used of an electrical apparatus: Playing your stereo too loudly will blow your speakers out. The surge in current blew out the microchips in my computer.
7. To stop functioning suddenly. Used of an electrical apparatus: Because the light bulb was old, it blew out.
8. To erupt in an uncontrolled manner. Used of a gas or oil well: If the safety valve breaks, the well might blow out and spill oil everywhere.
9. To diminish; subside. Used reflexively of windy weather conditions: Until the storm blows itself out, we'll have to stay inside.
See also: blow, out

blow over

v.
1. To upset or tip something or someone by the force of moving air: The hurricane blew over many large billboards. I set up a flagpole outside, but the wind blew it over.
2. To be upset or tipped by the force of moving air: Our tents blew over in the storm.
3. To subside or wane with little lasting effect; die down: The storm blew over quickly. The scandal will soon blow over.
See also: blow

blow up

v.
1. To destroy something or someone by explosion: The soldiers will blow the bridge up. The dynamite blew up the abandoned building.
2. To explode: I pressed the red button, and the bomb blew up.
3. To start suddenly and with force: A storm blew up as we were walking home.
4. To fill something with air or gas; inflate something: We need to blow up the tires of this old bicycle. The clown blew some balloons up for the kids to play with.
5. To increase the size or scale of an image of something, as for display or in order to view it more closely: We blew up the document to make a poster out of it. If we blow the photograph up we can see more detail.
6. To become very angry: My date blew up when I suggested we leave the party early.
7. To exaggerate something: Don't blow the story up into such a great disaster; it wasn't that bad. It may sound impressive, but I'm sure they're blowing up what really happened.
See also: blow, up

blow smoke

1. tv. to state something in a way that conceals the truth. (see also smoke and mirrors.) She is a master at blowing smoke. She belongs in government.
2. tv. to smoke marijuana. (Drugs.) Frank sits around blowing smoke when he’s not selling.
See also: blow, smoke

blow up

1. in. to burst into anger. So she blew up. Why should that affect you so much?
2. n. an angry outburst; a fight. (Usually blowup.) After the third blowup, she left him.
3. n. an enlarged version of a photograph, map, chart, etc. (Usually blowup.) Kelly sent a blowup of their wedding picture to all her relatives.
4. n. the ruination of something; the collapse of something. (Usually blowup.) The blowup in the financial world has ruined my chances for early retirement.
See also: blow, up

blown away

1. mod. dead; killed. (Underworld.) Four of the mob were already blown away when the cops got there.
2. and blown mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. Whatever that pill was, Cecilia is totally blown away. She’s blown and alone and making a groan.
3. mod. overwhelmed; greatly impressed. (Often with with or by.) We were just blown away by your good words.
See also: away, blown

blown

verb

blown (out)

mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. Fred stood at the door and told us he was blown—something that was totally obvious anyway.
See also: blown, out

blown

verb

blown (up)

mod. alcohol intoxicated. (see also blown away, blown (out).) You are blown as blazes, you twit!
See also: blown, up

blown

verb

blow smoke

1. To speak deceptively.
2. To brag or exaggerate.
See also: blow, smoke
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