blow wide open

blow something wide open

 and bust something wide open
Sl. to expose corrupt practices or a secret plan; to put an end to corruption. The press is trying to blow the town wide open, and the feds are trying to hush them up so they can move about in secret. I'm going to bust this racket wide open.
See also: blow, open, wide

blow something wide open

 
1. to make it impossible to guess who will win a competition She was the favourite to win, so her withdrawal has blown the election wide open.
2. to make something that someone is trying to achieve fail completely, often by telling people something which should have been a secret He's threatening to blow the whole operation wide open if we don't give him a bigger share of the profits.
See also: blow, open, wide
References in periodicals archive ?
Unless it's in the pages of IDW Publishing's "X-Files: Conspiracy,'' a sprawling six-part story that sees the Lone Gunmen trio attempting to blow wide open rumors of Transformers, Ghostbusters and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles -- among others -- to a public that has been kept in the dark.
The fishing boom is a little behind the surf boom, but it is about to blow wide open.
It's a different challenge and it's going to be hard, but anything can happen if you are in the right move at the right time - races can blow wide open.
This newspaper will give every ounce of support to your efforts to blow wide open this abhorrent activity.
And Ellis's tough stance is threatening to blow wide open the chairman/manager rift which has flared up several times in the past.
The case will blow wide open the secret workings of Special Branch," said a senior RUC officer.
It's time to blow wide open the myth that Frame Relay is limited to `low speeds.
FORMER Tory leader Rod Richards is writing an explosive book to blow wide open the politics of the Conservative Party in Wales.