blow off


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

blow off

 
1. Lit. [for something] to be carried off something by moving air. The leaves of the trees blew off in the strong wind. My papers blew off the table.
2. Lit. [for a valve or pressure-maintaining device] to be forced off or away by high pressure. (See the examples.) The safety valve blew off and all the pressure escaped. The valve blew off, making a loud pop.
3. Fig. [for someone] to become angry; to lose one's temper; to blow off (some) steam. I just needed to blow off. Sorry for the outburst. I blew off at her.
4. Sl. to goof off; to waste time; to procrastinate. You blow off too much. All your best time is gone—blown off.
5. Sl. a time-waster; a goof-off. (Usually blow-off.) Fred is such a blow-off! Get busy. I don't pay blow-offs around here.
6. Sl. something that can be done easily or without much effort. (Usually blow-off.) Oh, that is just a blow-off. Nothing to it. The test was easy—a blow-off.
7. and blow someone or something off Sl. to ignore someone or something; to skip an appointment with someone; to not attend something where one is expected. He decided to sleep in and blow this class off. It wasn't right for you to just blow off an old friend the way you did.
8. and blow someone off Sl. to ignore someone in order to end a romantic or other relationship. She knew that he had blown her off when he didn't even call her for a month. Steve blew off Rachel before he started seeing Jane.
9. Sl the final insult; an event that causes a dispute. (Usually blow-off.) The blow-off was a call from some girl named Lulu who asked for Snookums. When the blow-off happened, nobody was expecting anything.
10. Sl. a dispute; an argument. (Usually blow-off.) After a blow-off like that, we all need a break. There was a big blow-off in the office today.
See also: blow, off

blow somebody off

also blow off somebody
to not meet someone you planned to meet Bates blew me off this morning but then asked me to meet him tonight.
See also: blow, off

blow off something

also blow something off
1. to get rid of something The old millionaire blew off one marriage to wed his new partner. Your average worker can't just blow off his credit-card debt.
2. to consider something to be unimportant Some students will simply blow off exams they don't think will be part of their records.
See also: blow, off

blow off

1. Vent one's strong feelings; see blow off steam.
2. Disregard, ignore; evade something important. For example, If you blow off your homework, you're bound to run into trouble on the exam. [Slang; second half of 1900s]
3. Overcome, defeat easily, as in With Rob pitching, we'll have no trouble blowing off the opposing team. [Slang; 1950s] Also see blow away, def. 2.
4. Ignore, abandon, refuse to take part. For example, The college is blowing off our request for a new student center. [Slang; mid-1900s]
See also: blow, off

blow off

v.
1. To push or carry something away from something by the force of moving air: A gust of wind blew my hat off my head. The strong wind blew off the napkins that we had put on the tables.
2. To be pushed or carried off by the force of moving air: If I put a weather vane on top of the house, do you think it would blow off?
3. To remove something with powerful or violent force: The bomb blasts blew off the side of the building. The exploding car engine blew the hood off.
4. Slang To avoid or neglect some responsibility or obligation: Yesterday I blew off all my work and went to the movies. I know you don't want to go to work today, but if you blow your job off, you'll get fired.
5. Slang To fail to keep an appointment with someone: She's annoyed because her date blew her off. He's pretty reliable, and he won't blow you off.
6. Slang To abandon or leave someone behind in a rude way: The movie star suddenly blew off the waiting crowd and left the building. We set off to go fishing together, but halfway there my friends blew me off and went to the park instead.
7. Slang To treat something as unimportant; dismiss or ignore something: The writer blew off the criticism and continued to write as before. They made an unkind remark, but I just blew it off.
8. Vulgar Slang To perform fellatio on someone.
See also: blow, off

blow off

1. in. to goof off; to waste time; to procrastinate. You blow off too much.
2. n. a time-waster; a goof-off. (Usually blow-off.) Get busy. I don’t pay blow-offs around here.
3. n. something that can be done easily or without much effort. (Usually blow-off.) The test was a blow-off.
4. n. the final insult; an event that causes a dispute. (Usually blow-off.) The blow-off was a call from some dame named Monica who asked for Snookums.
5. n. a dispute; an argument. (see also blow up.) After a blow-off like that, we need a breather.
See also: blow, off
References in periodicals archive ?
It is not clear who will pay for any blow off in future.
The new site is the end of the line, and having the blow off here keeps the flow going steadily, officials said.
Previously, at the former blow off site near 10 North Main Street LLC, water had been released in excess of 35 gallons per minute, officials said.
Paicos defended the blow off process as "quite logical'' and "defensible'' from hydrological and engineering points of view.
Paicos conceded that a blow off valve on a permanent basis may be a bit unusual.
Also, mills typically do not know how much air is compressed, how much is used appropriately, and how much is wasted through artificial demand, drainage, blow off, open blowing, leaks, or poor applications.
A compressed air audit consists of a thorough analysis of the supply side of the system to determine power consumed, volume compressed, drainage wasted, blow off, and pressure fluctuations.
The canopy jettison handle sits forward of the copilot gunner window (CPG) under a quick release panel for the ground crew to blow off the side panels in an emergency evacuation.
One Garda spokesman warned: "Some of these fireworks are like small sticks of dynamite and will blow off part of your hand.