blitz

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blitz (one) out

To surprise, unsettle, and confuse someone. The sudden, blaring alarm blitzed us out—nobody moved until our teacher yelled for us to evacuate the building. I had to sit down because hearing such terrible news really blitzed me out.
See also: blitz, out

blitz someone out

Sl. to shock or disorient someone. The accident blitzed her out for a moment. The second act blitzed out the audience and thrilled them to pieces.
See also: blitz, out

blitz

(blɪts)
1. n. a devastating attack. After that blitz from the boss, you must feel sort of shaken.
2. tv. to attack and defeat someone or demolish something. The team from downstate blitzed our local team for the third year in a row.

blitz someone out

tv. to shock or disorient someone. The accident blitzed her out for a moment.
See also: blitz, out, someone
References in periodicals archive ?
Another effective disguise would be to run the blitzes from a cover 2 shell.
If your defense is blessed with good athletes, you can run these blitzes with man coverage.
We misfired on a couple of blitzes in terms of how we fitted.
For example, if the first defender inside a playside guard is the backside linebacker and a playside linebacker blitzes the inside gap, the guard must block the playside linebacker even though the LB was not aligned inside of him.
He uses the same blocking rules as the other playside blockers with one exception: He will never block a LB unless he blitzes the backside A gap.
Inside blitzes will seldom work because the ball will be gone before the blitzer can get there, and the blitzer will be unable to flow toward the QB and pitchman.
Outside blitzes are more likely to succeed because they come from the side under attack by the option.
He is ready to block "M" if he blitzes, or to release on a flare route if he drops.
The opposing coaches are going to put all kinds of pressure on the quarterback, using all kinds of blitzes to break down the protection.
Most high school football coaches resign themselves to playing a safe, maximum coverage defense, one that rarely blitzes and that uses a "bend but don't break" approach.