blimp

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Colonel Blimp

An older man who is pompous or irritable and adheres to an outdated ideology. The name comes from a British comic strip character that first appeared in the London Evening Standard newspaper in 1934. Primarily heard in UK. He's such a Colonel Blimp when he starts ranting about his views on welfare and the poor.
See also: blimp

blimp out

1. derogatory slang To gain an excessive amount of weight. Have you seen Phil recently? He's really blimped out since college.
2. slang To eat an excessive amount of food, especially junk food. It's hard not to blimp out at a Super Bowl party where there's a lot of junk food.
See also: blimp, out

blimp out

to overeat; to eat too much and gain weight. I blimp out almost every weekend. If I could stop blimping out, I could lose some weight.
See also: blimp, out

Have a blimp!

Sl. Have a good year! (A reference to the Goodyear blimp, which is famous for being at notable events.) Good-bye. Have a blimp! Have a blimp! See you next summer.
See also: have

blimp

n. a nickname for an obese person. This enormous blimp managed to get on the plane but couldn’t get into a seat.

blimp out

in. to overeat. I love to buy a bag of chips and just blimp out.
See also: blimp, out

blimped

mod. alcohol intoxicated; swollen with drinking. I am still a little blimped from our party last night.
See also: blimp

Have a blimp!

exclam. Have a good year! (A play on Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, which operates the Goodyear blimp.) Have a blimp! See you next summer.
See also: have
References in periodicals archive ?
Vocally, he's a delight to listen to as he translates Elizabethan blank verse into upper-class blimpish harrumphings; but the problem is that the character who should have the voice that McKellen's invented isn't Richard III, a problem that bulks even larger for the rest Of the assembled cast than for McKellen, who at least has a string of good arias, while they are constantly having to define their characters as they mouth Shakespeare's words and mime Contradictory actions generated by the 1930s overlay.
As the contemptuous letter mentioned at the start made clear, such courage in the call of duty was still obviously not good enough for some Colonel Blimpish diehards.
In fact, it marked one of those rare occasions when the more blimpish and Anglophile members of golf clubs in this country embraced the idea of being European.
Blimpish elephant and family; a comically threatening snake; some vultures and monkeys; and, most significantly, a predatory tiger, Shere Khan (made to sound like "The Lion King's" Scar reincarnate by thesp Tony Jay).
Parliamentary support he thought silly and blimpish -- a distasteful episode.
There was also some classically Thatcherite stuff about national pride, including the authentic cry of Blimpish agony contained in the following:
His enjoyable, fluent book reads best when it is pricking the egos of figures of authority, be they Blimpish army officers or prolix rabbis.
His enjoyable, fluent book reads best when it is pricking the egos of figures of authority, bet hey Blimpish army officers or prolix rabbis.
One understands, without pardoning, the young Waugh: ambitious, careerist, touched by genius; a fighter for his voice, yet willing to purge his novels of his more Blimpish views in the cause of art; a snob and social climber who sought to free himself from the Bright Young Thing image and who was never really accepted by the aristocrats who condescended to let him amuse them.
Try as he might to extract some cheap laughs from Colin Wilson's claims to genius, or Kingsley Amis' blimpish right-wing attitudes, Carpenter is on altogether safer ground when he simply tells the stories of the individuals involved.
Toad was an impressive performance by Neil Williams, the dashing Rattie of George Kell and David Cawford's blimpish Badger were not actors to her, they were real animals.
Take the blimpish Tory, the raging Belgian general, the unreformed Wehrmacht officer or the reformed French gauchiste defending Western civilization to the last free drink at Aspen Institute, Berlin, or in Ditchley Park, near Oxford.