blasted


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be blasted to smithereens

To be blown up or broken apart into tiny, fragmentary pieces. "Smithereens," first appearing in English in 1829 as "smiddereens," is likely derived from the Irish word "smidirín" or "smidiríní," meaning "fragment." I wish I could still go visit our old family home, but it's already been blasted to smithereens by the demolition crew. The village was blasted to smithereens by the typhoon's gale-force winds.
See also: blasted, smithereens

blast away

1. To be extremely loud. If grandma's TV is blasting away, gently remind her to put in her hearing aids.
2. To vehemently criticize someone or something. The senator's disgusted constituents blasted away at him during the town hall meeting.
See also: away, blast

blast off

1. To shoot upward from the ground, as of a rocket. The rocket blasted off successfully and is now headed for the moon. My kids love blasting off toy rockets in the backyard and seeing how high they'll go.
2. To ignite an exploding device, such as fireworks. Our poor dog is hiding under the bed because our neighbors celebrate the Fourth of July by blasting off tons of fireworks.
3. To use an explosion to destroy or remove something. After the emergency crew blasted off some rocks, they were able to free the trapped hikers from the cave.
4. To amputate by means of an explosion. I'm really worried my fool husband is going to blast off a hand while playing with those fireworks!
5. To depart very quickly. The robbers blasted off when they heard the approaching sirens.
6. To strike with a lot of force in order to remove something, as with a pressure washer or sandblaster. In this usage, a noun can be used between "blast" and "off." The sidewalk looks so clean this morning! I guess someone from the township blasted all the stains off of it. We can blast off that graffiti with the pressure washer.
See also: blast, off

blast off

 (for some place)
1. [for a space vehicle] to take off and head toward a destination. The rocket blasted off for the moon. Will it blast off on time?
2. Sl. [for someone] to leave for a destination quickly. Ann blasted off for the library so she could study. I've got to blast off. It's late.
See also: blast, off

blast (something) off (something else)

to remove something from something else with a powerful charge, pressure, or force. They blasted the writing off the wall with a stream of sand. We will have to blast the paint off the wall.
See also: blast, off

blast away

1. to be very loud The radio blasted away with sad country and western songs.
2. to strongly criticize or attack with words People with no sense at all blast away on talk radio all day. The prosecutor blasted away at him without letup.
See also: away, blast

blast off

1. Also, blast away. Take off or be launched, especially into space, as in They're scheduled to blast off on Tuesday. This usage originated with the development of powerful rockets, spacecraft, and astronauts, to all of which it was applied. [c. 1950]
2. Depart, clear out, as in This party's over; let's blast off now. [Slang; early 1950s]
3. Become excited or high, especially from using drugs, as in They give parties where people blast off. [Slang; c. 1960]
See also: blast, off

blast off

v.
1. To be launched off the ground. Used of rockets: The astronauts were strapped in their seats and ready to blast off.
2. To launch some rocket from the ground: The space agency needs a new location to blast off its spacecraft. The kids set up their model rockets on the field and blasted them off.
3. To explode or fire something: I blasted off some firecrackers during the celebration. I put some bullets in the gun and blasted a few rounds off to test it.
4. To dislodge or remove something with an explosion: Be careful not to blast your fingers off with that loaded gun! To make room for the new road, the workers blasted off a large rock from the side of the hill.
5. Slang To depart for a destination: We need to blast off right now if we are going to get to the party on time.
See also: blast, off

blast off

verb
See also: blast, off

blasted

1. mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. I got so blasted I swore never to blow another joint.
2. mod. damned. Shut your blasted mouth!
References in classic literature ?
With that rich perfume of her breath she blasted the very air.
TWO Blighted Beings, haggard, lachrymose, and detested, met on a blasted heath in the light of a struggling moon.
Elizabeth was sad and desponding; she no longer took delight in her ordinary occupations; all pleasure seemed to her sacrilege toward the dead; eternal woe and tears she then thought was the just tribute she should pay to innocence so blasted and destroyed.
Eric Thomas, President and CEO of ABS Blast, stated, "Our common sense approach to designing a blast room begins with understanding the size of the items to be blasted.
In addition, said one foundry, "With the purchase of dry ice blast a couple of years ago, molds can be blasted and sprayed quickly in the casting machine while the molds are still hot.
It's been going on so long, and they have blasted the rock so many times," lamented Ryoko Honma, a resident of the nearby fishing village of Furubira, where many of the 19 people trapped on the bus are from.
The only dust with steel-grit sanding comes from the dirt being blasted off the surface being cleaned.