blast


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Related to blast: have a blast, blast 2, NCBI, FASTA

blast to smithereens

To explode or otherwise destroy something into tiny, fragmentary pieces. Smithereens, first appearing in 1829 as "smiddereens," is likely derived from the Irish word "smidirín" or "smidiríní," meaning fragment. The demolition crew came in and blasted the house to smithereens. The small band of rebels didn't stand a chance; they were blasted to smithereens as soon as the loyalists had them in sight.
See also: blast, smithereens

a blast from the past

Someone or something that evokes a sense of nostalgia. Bumping into my old high school sweetheart in the grocery store was a real blast from the past. Wow, I used to have this baseball card when I was kid. What a blast from the past!
See also: blast, past

*at full blast

using full power; as loudly as possible. (*Typically: be on ~; play ~; play something ~; run ~; run something ~.) The neighbors had their televisions on at full blast. The car radio was on at full blast. We couldn't hear what the driver was saying.
See also: blast, full

blast off

 (for some place)
1. [for a space vehicle] to take off and head toward a destination. The rocket blasted off for the moon. Will it blast off on time?
2. Sl. [for someone] to leave for a destination quickly. Ann blasted off for the library so she could study. I've got to blast off. It's late.
See also: blast, off

blast (something) off (something else)

to remove something from something else with a powerful charge, pressure, or force. They blasted the writing off the wall with a stream of sand. We will have to blast the paint off the wall.
See also: blast, off

have a blast

Inf. to have a great time; to have a lot of fun. The food was good and we had a blast. Thanks for inviting us to the party.
See also: blast, have

a blast from the past

something that makes you suddenly remember an earlier time in your life Here's a blast from the past - the 1960s group the Mamas and the Papas were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame this week.
See also: blast, past

blast away

1. to be very loud The radio blasted away with sad country and western songs.
2. to strongly criticize or attack with words People with no sense at all blast away on talk radio all day. The prosecutor blasted away at him without letup.
See also: away, blast

full blast

1. with enthusiasm and energy When he's here and going full blast, we're all worn out by his energy. Related vocabulary: go all out
2. with as much power as possible She's been running her air-conditioners full blast for months.
3. as loud as possible Somebody put on “The Star Spangled Banner” and turned the volume up full blast.
See also: blast, full

have a blast

to enjoy doing something very much Sky watchers are having a blast keeping track of the comet. They had a blast poking around the farmers' market looking at all the food.
See also: blast, have

a blast from the past

  (informal)
something that suddenly and strongly makes you remember a previous time in your life Hearing that record again was a real blast from the past.
See blast to kingdom come
See also: blast, past

blast/blow somebody/something to kingdom come

  (informal)
to kill someone or destroy something by using a gun or bomb Fifteen soldiers were blown to kingdom come in the attack. Police discovered a bomb which was large enough to blast the whole town to kingdom come.
See also: blast, come, kingdom

blast off

1. Also, blast away. Take off or be launched, especially into space, as in They're scheduled to blast off on Tuesday. This usage originated with the development of powerful rockets, spacecraft, and astronauts, to all of which it was applied. [c. 1950]
2. Depart, clear out, as in This party's over; let's blast off now. [Slang; early 1950s]
3. Become excited or high, especially from using drugs, as in They give parties where people blast off. [Slang; c. 1960]
See also: blast, off

full blast

Also, at full blast. At full power, with great energy; also, as loud as possible. For example, The committee is working full blast on the plans, or The fanfare featured the trumpets at full blast. This expression transfers the strong currents of air used in furnaces to anything being done at full power. [Late 1700s]
See also: blast, full

blast off

v.
1. To be launched off the ground. Used of rockets: The astronauts were strapped in their seats and ready to blast off.
2. To launch some rocket from the ground: The space agency needs a new location to blast off its spacecraft. The kids set up their model rockets on the field and blasted them off.
3. To explode or fire something: I blasted off some firecrackers during the celebration. I put some bullets in the gun and blasted a few rounds off to test it.
4. To dislodge or remove something with an explosion: Be careful not to blast your fingers off with that loaded gun! To make room for the new road, the workers blasted off a large rock from the side of the hill.
5. Slang To depart for a destination: We need to blast off right now if we are going to get to the party on time.
See also: blast, off

beer blast

and beer bust
n. a beer-drinking party; a beer binge. Kelly’s having a beer blast at his place, starting tonight. Dad, I think your “beer bust” is called something else now.
See also: beer, blast

blast

1. n. an exciting party. What a blast we had!
2. n. a thrill; a kick. The roller coaster was a blast.
3. tv. to shoot someone with a gun. The speeding car drove by, and somebody tried to blast him with a machine gun.
4. tv. to attack or criticize someone or something verbally. He blasted his brother until we all left in embarrassment.
5. n. a verbal attack. The senator leveled a blast at the administration.
6. n. the kick or rush from taking or injecting a drug. (Drugs.) With a blast like that, somebody’s gonna get hooked fast.

blast off (for somewhere)

in. [for someone] to leave for a destination quickly. I’ve got to blast off. It’s late.
See also: blast, off, somewhere

blast off

verb
See also: blast, off

full blast

mod. as strongly as possible. He honked the horn full blast for a long time.
See also: blast, full

full blast

At full speed, volume, or capacity: turned the radio up full blast.
See also: blast, full
References in periodicals archive ?
ABS Blast designs, manufactures, and installs a broad range of blast room equipment; from self contained portable reclaim modules to complete custom facilities for the Military, Rail, Aircraft, Wind, and other industries.
The interior blast mill design has no moving parts, which prevents pinching and jamming of small parts and reduces maintenance.
An early Magma adopter, TI has been instrumental in shaping enhancements to the Blast Fusion system.
Sensitive seismic listening posts around the world picked up only some of the nuclear blasts India said it detonated last week, according to U.
This stunt, especially from the open-end side, made it very difficult to run the blast.
Quartz RC can be accessed within the Blast Fusion flow or can be used as a standalone system by ASIC designers via industry-standard LEF/DEF (Library Exchange Format/Design Exchange Format) input.
The creative inspiration for BLAST magazine rides the coattails of a success story in the multimedia world, "Morph's Outpost on the Digital Frontier.
creates, designs, develops, manufactures and markets proprietary blast mitigation materials.
In addition, said one foundry, "With the purchase of dry ice blast a couple of years ago, molds can be blasted and sprayed quickly in the casting machine while the molds are still hot.
one of the two Dos Vientos Ranch developers, said proper safety precautions were taken and city officials were present before, during and after the blast.
Blast FPGA is specifically designed to meet the needs of high-performance, low-power FPGA designs, and can take full advantage of Stratix III's advanced FPGA architecture.
The air blast was so severe that a volcano expert from Washington state visited Yosemite to survey the damage.
From a chemical standpoint, water vapor in the blast air reacts with incandescent coke in the cupola according to the following water-gas reaction:
A third dynamite blast failed today to remove a huge boulder that trapped people in a highway tunnel in northern Japan.