black gum


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black gum

A deciduous tree (Nyssa sylvatica) native to eastern North America, known for the shades of bright scarlet its leaves turn in the autumn; also known as sour gum, black tupelo, or simply tupelo. The leaves of the black gum are an amazing sight in autumn.
See also: black, gum
References in periodicals archive ?
The answer is that black gum berries are a very situational deer food source, often only being consumed after a heavy wind has occurred causing whole branches (replete with the dark blue berry-like fruit attached) to cascade to the ground.
The Water Tupelo, as its name implies, is found in wetlands, while the Black Gum can be found on wooded slopes.
If you want to mainly attract birds to your yard, consider some trees like live oak, black gum, flowering dogwood and red mulberry; or shrubs like common juniper, hollies, trumpet creeper or vines and wild grape.
Black gum tupelo trees sometimes decay in an unusual manner--from the top of the tree downward.
The obvious woody species include red bay (Perseapalustris), white bay (Magnolia virginiana), large gallberry (Ilex coriacea), and black gum (Nyssa sylvatica).
LOS ANGELES, May 2, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Black gums treatment expert, Dr.
Salmon anglers must hark back to 1997 for decent opening-day takes of kings, with their distinctive black gums.
And Southern California has had a recent history of remarkable takes of the silver-sided denizens with the distinctive black gums that are also known as chinooks.