biting


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Related to biting: biting point, biting tongue

bite back

1. To stop oneself from saying something that is potentially inappropriate, hurtful, or offensive. I had to bite back a snarky comment as my sister gushed about her new boyfriend.
2. To retaliate against a verbal attack. I wouldn't talk badly about Tiffany, if I were you—she bites back. I mean, you heard the vicious rumor she started about the girl who stole her boyfriend!
3. To retaliate by biting, as by an animal. The dog lunged at the cat, and the cat bit back.
See also: back, bite

bite into (something or someone)

1. Literally, to clench between one's teeth, as of food. I can't wait to bite into my hamburger&mdash—I'm so hungry! Unfortunately, I didn't realize the casserole was still cold until I bit into it.
2. To cause one physical pain, as of the wind. When I couldn't stand the icy wind biting into me anymore, I ran for the ski lodge.
See also: bite

bite (one's) nails

1. Literally, to chew on one's fingernails and shorten them. I wish I didn't bite my nails, but it's been such a hard habit to try to break. My sister gets regular manicures to keep from biting her nails.
2. To nervously await something. I've been biting my nails ever since I submitted my application for my first-choice college.
See also: bite, nail

bite off

To use the teeth to pull off something. The bitten item can be named before or after "off." We had to take the dog to the vet after he bit off and ate a piece of a questionable-looking plant. Once the lollipop was soft enough, I bit it off the stick
See also: bite, off

bite on (something or someone)

1. Literally, to use the teeth to hold or take something; to chew on something. We had to take the dog to the vet after he bit on that questionable-looking plant. The teething baby bit on her rattle.
2. To be attracted to someone or something with an appealing, but ultimately false, promise. The fish are not biting on my lure today—do I need to use different bait? I can't believe those freshmen bit on the promise of going to a big party tonight. Once they get here, we're going to make them wash our gear instead!
3. To imitate or copy another person in some way. My little sister is constantly biting on me because she likes how I dress—it's so annoying!
See also: bite, on

bite the big one

1. slang To die. We were so lucky to avoid that massive accident—we could have bitten the big one!
2. vulgar slang To be remarkably bad, unpleasant, disappointing, or upsetting. Well, that movie bit the big one. I wish I could get my money back! Yeah, I heard that class bites the big one.
See also: big, bite, one

bite the bullet

To do or accept something unpleasant, often after a period of hesitation. The phrase is thought to have come from the military, perhaps because biting a bullet was a common practice for patients, due to a lack of anesthesia. I don't actually enjoy cleaning, but I bite the bullet and do it so that everything in my house isn't covered in a thick layer of dust. I know she's disappointed to have not gotten her dream job, but the sooner she bites the bullet and accepts it, the sooner she can move on.
See also: bite, bullet

bite the dust

1. slang Of a person, to die. We were so lucky to avoid that massive accident—we might have bitten the dust!
2. slang Of a machine, to be near a complete breakdown or loss of functionality. Judging by all that noise coming from her car, I'm pretty sure it's about to bite the dust. I have to go buy a new blender because mine bit the dust today.
3. slang To become unpopular or irrelevant. Sadly, it doesn't take long for the latest technological innovations to bite the dust.
See also: bite, dust

bite back

 (at someone or something)
1. Lit. to defend an attack by biting at someone or something. (Usually an animal.) I threatened the dog and the dog bit back.
2. Fig. to fight back at someone; to return someone's anger or attack; to speak back to someone with anger. She is usually tolerant, but she will bite back if pressed. Yes, she will bite back.
See also: back, bite

bite something off

to remove something in a bite. Ann bit a piece off and chewed it up. She bit off a piece.
See also: bite, off

bite the big one

Sl. to die. I was so tired that I thought I was going to bite the big one. I hope I am old and gray when I bite the big one.
See also: big, bite, one

bite the bullet

Sl. to accept something difficult and try to live with it. You are just going to have to bite the bullet and make the best of it. Jim bit the bullet and accepted what he knew had to be.
See also: bite, bullet

bite the dust

 
1. Sl. to die. A shot rang out, and another cowboy bit the dust. The soldier was too young to bite the dust.
2. Sl. to break; to fail; to give out. My old car finally bit the dust. This pen is out of ink and has bitten the dust.
See also: bite, dust

bite the big one

(slang)
to be very bad That movie really bites the big one.
See also: big, bite, one

bite the bullet

to do or accept something difficult or unpleasant We've all experienced unpleasant moments when we had to bite the bullet and apologize for something we did.
Etymology: based on the literal action of biting on bullets that was done by soldiers in the past who were operated on without drugs
See also: bite, bullet

bite the dust

to stop existing Back in the '50s we had many competitors, but most have bitten the dust. Another fashion fad has bitten the dust.
See also: bite, dust

bite the bullet

to make yourself do something or accept something difficult or unpleasant
Usage notes: When army doctors performed painful operations without drugs, they gave patients a bullet to put between their teeth.
They decided to bite the bullet and pay the extra for the house they really wanted. Car drivers are biting the bullet after another rise in petrol prices.
See also: bite, bullet

bite the dust

 
1. (informal) to fail or to stop existing Three hundred more people lost their jobs in the same region when another firm bit the dust. She can't make it on Saturday? Oh, well, another good idea bites the dust!
2. (humorous) to die Two Hollywood stars of the thirties have recently bitten the dust.
See also: bite, dust

What's biting somebody?

  (informal)
something that you say in order to ask why someone is in a bad mood What's biting her? She hasn't said a word all morning.

nail-biting

a nail-biting event or period of time makes you feel very nervous, usually because you are waiting for something important to happen (always before noun) The teams were very evenly matched and played a close game right up to the nail-biting finish.

bite the bullet

Behave bravely or stoically when facing pain or a difficult situation, as in If they want to cut the budget deficit, they are going to have to bite the bullet and find new sources of revenue . This phrase is of military origin, but the precise allusion is uncertain. Some say it referred to the treatment of a wounded soldier without anesthesia, so that he would be asked to bite on a lead bullet during treatment. Also, Francis Grose's Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (1796) holds that grenadiers being disciplined with the cat-o'nine-tails would bite on a bullet to avoid crying out in pain.
See also: bite, bullet

bite the dust

Suffer defeat or death, as in The 1990 election saw both of our senators bite the dust. Although this expression was popularized by American Western films of the 1930s, in which either cowboys or Indians were thrown from their horses to the dusty ground, it originated much earlier. Tobias Smollett had it in Gil Blas (1750): "We made two of them bite the dust."
See also: bite, dust

bite the big one

tv. to die. I was so tired that I thought I was going to bite the big one.
See also: big, bite, one

bite the bullet

tv. to accept something difficult and try to live with it. You are just going to have to bite the bullet and make the best of it.
See also: bite, bullet

bite the dust

1. tv. to die. A shot rang out, and another cowboy bit the dust.
2. tv. to break; to fail; to give out. My car finally bit the dust.
See also: bite, dust

bite the bullet

Slang
To face a painful situation bravely and stoically.
See also: bite, bullet

bite the dust

Slang
1. To fall dead, especially in combat.
2. To be defeated.
3. To come to an end.
See also: bite, dust

bite the bullet

To bear up in an unpleasant or a difficult situation. In the days before anesthesia, a wounded soldier about to undergo surgery was given a bullet to clamp in his teeth and bear down on so he wouldn't bite off his tongue from the pain.
See also: bite, bullet
References in classic literature ?
His parting gibes were listened to in a dead, boding silence, and, with these biting words in his mouth, the triumphant Magua passed unmolested into the forest, followed by his passive captive, and protected by the inviolable laws of Indian hospitality.
There came cruel, cold, and biting winds, and blizzards of snow, all testing relentlessly for failing muscles and impoverished blood.
And when it had got to the worst, and it seemed to me that I could not stand anything more, a fly got in through the bars and settled on my nose, and the bars were stuck and wouldn't work, and I couldn't get the visor up; and I could only shake my head, which was baking hot by this time, and the fly -- well, you know how a fly acts when he has got a certainty -- he only minded the shaking enough to change from nose to lip, and lip to ear, and buzz and buzz all around in there, and keep on lighting and biting, in a way that a person, already so distressed as I was, simply could not stand.
And my money,' she continued; returning his angry glare, and meantime biting a piece of crust, the remnant of her breakfast.
I instantly ran into the room, and found Magdalen on the sofa in violent hysterics, and Frank standing staring at her, with a lowering, angry face, biting his nails.
The officers looked towards the soldiers who looked at the fire; gave no orders; and answered, with shrugs and biting of lips, "It must burn.
It was cold, bleak, biting weather: foggy withal: and he could hear the people in the court outside, go wheezing up and down, beating their hands upon their breasts, and stamping their feet upon the pavement stones to warm them.
Creakle came to where I sat, and told me that if I were famous for biting, he was famous for biting, too.
And then the red faces made their way through the black biting frost to their own homes, feeling themselves free for the rest of the day to eat, drink, and be merry, and using that Christian freedom without diffidence.