bird of passage

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bird of passage

A person who remains unfixed to a certain location, relocating from one place to another. The economy has forced me to become a bird of passage, moving around the state to wherever I can find work.
See also: bird, of, passage

bird of passage

A transient, one who is here today and gone tomorrow. For example, Mary moves nearly every year; she's a true bird of passage. This phrase transfers the literal meaning of a migrating bird to human behavior. [Second half of 1700s]
See also: bird, of, passage
References in periodicals archive ?
The only mention of Philae in Birds of Passage, though, comes in the "Prelude," a discussion of which began this article, and there her emphasis, like Loti's, is on reverence for the Egypt of the past.
6)--Egypt comes to represent in Birds of Passage either a mysterious origin or a terrifying future for a West that the poet identifies with the dynamic present.
In contrast to the extremity of the East, the West of Birds of Passage is, by-and-large, marked by temperate weather and lush scenery.
Birds of Passage is a wonderful book of poetry, filled with some of Blind's best verse, and it caps the extraordinary career of a versatile poet capable of both daring and refinement.
22) Armstrong has little to say, however, about Birds of Passage, though her one comment--that for it and other works Blind "ransacked different cultures for material" (p.
and] a sceptic," (24) but, despite its inclusion of "The Beautiful Beeshareen Boy," it characterizes the poetry of Birds of Passage solely through a reference to the "lighthearted" nature of the poem "A Fantasy.
However, if her thoughts on Shelley and her own evolutionary epic imply that Blind held a view of the Orient as simply a stop on the developmental road to the West, the "Prelude" to Birds of Passage reminds us that she was also tempted to reverse direction and journey East.
East, West, Past, Present, the poet of Birds of Passage comfortably traverses all these terrains in language, as Blind comfortably traveled in Egypt under the care of Thomas Cook's steamers and modern tourist hotels, such as the landmark Shepheard's.