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Related to binges: personality test

binge and purge

to overeat and vomit, alternatively and repeatedly. (A symptom of the condition called bulimia.) She had binged and purged a number of times before she finally sought help from a doctor. Terry had been bingeing and purging for a number of years and was very, very thin.
See also: and, binge, purge

Go on.

1. Lit. Please continue. Alice: I guess I should stop here. Tom: No. Don't stop talking. I'm very interested. Go on. Bill: Don't turn here. Go on. It's the next corner. Bob: Thanks. I didn't think that was where we should turn.
2. Lit. to happen. What went on here last night? The teacher asked what was going on.
3. Fig. That's silly!; You don't mean that! (Usually Go on!) John: Go on! You're making that up! Bill: I am not. It's the truth! Bill: Gee, that looks like a snake there in the path. Bob: Go on! That isn't a snake. No snake is that big.

go on a binge

to do too much of something, especially to drink too much. Jane went on a binge last night and is very sick this morning. Bill loves to spend money on clothes. He's out on a binge right now—buying everything in sight.
See also: binge

go on (and on) (about someone or something)

to talk endlessly about someone or something. She just went on and on about her new car. Albert went on about the book for a long time.

go on (at someone)

to rave at someone. He must have gone on at her for ten minutes—screaming and waving his arms. I wish you would stop going on at me.

go on something

1. Lit. to begin something, such as a diet, rampage, drunk, etc. I went on a diet for the second time this month. Fred went on a rampage and broke a window.
2. Fig. to start acting on some information. We can't go on this! We need more information before we can act on this matter! Can you please give us more information to go on?

go on

1. to continue We can't go on living in such a small house.
Usage notes: sometimes used to encourage someone to continue: Go on, tell me what happened next!
2. to happen We had to make sure we understood what was going on. She wants to know everything that goes on in Europe.

go on

1. Happen, take place, as in What's going on here? [Early 1700s]
2. Continue, as in The show must go on. [Late 1500s]
3. Keep on doing; also, proceed, as in He went on talking, or She may go on to become a partner. [Second half of 1600s]
4. Act, behave, especially badly. For example, Don't go on like that; stop kicking the dog. [Second half of 1700s]
5. Also, go on and on; run on. Talk volubly, chatter, especially tiresomely. For example, How she does go on! The first usage dates from the mid-1800s; run on appeared in Nicholas Udall's Ralph Roister Doister (c. 1553): "Yet your tongue can run on."
6. An interjection expressing disbelief, surprise, or the like, as in Go on, you must be joking! [Late 1800s]
7. Approach; see going on.
8. Use as a starting point or as evidence, as in The investigator doesn't have much to go on in this case. [Mid-1900s]
9. go on something. Begin something, as in go on line, meaning "start to use a computer," or go on a binge, meaning "begin to overdo, especially drink or eat too much."

go on

1. To move forward; proceed: The train went on down the tracks. We were tired of walking, but we went on anyway.
2. To put oneself on some surface: I went on the roof to fix the leak.
3. To connect with some computer or computer network: You can go on the Internet to find rare books.
4. To stretch or extend from a place. Used of paths of motion: This road goes on from here through many more towns before reaching the ocean. The river goes on to the lake. The desert goes on for miles in every direction.
5. To use something as a mode of conveyance: The buses weren't running, so I went on the train.
6. To embark on some trip, excursion, or similar activity: My kids went on a hike. I have always wanted to go on a safari. Let's go on a roller coaster ride.
7. To be carried away by some emotionally charged activity: The killer went on a rampage. The reporter remarked about the deranged person who went on a shooting spree.
8. To take place; happen: What is going on in that noisy room? There is a lot going on in the market. I couldn't go to the meeting, so please tell me what went on.
9. To continue: The speech went on for almost an hour. The temperature will fall as the day goes on. If they go on fighting like this, there will be nothing left when the war is over.
10. To continue doing something: I can't go on arguing with you every day. I'm sorry I interrupted you—please go on. We walked until we couldn't go on any longer.
11. To make an appearance on some public medium, such as a stage or television broadcast: The actor went on TV to help raise money for the charity. You should dress quickly for your performance—you go on in half an hour.
12. To begin. Used especially of performances or broadcasts: The show goes on at 6:00. The show first went on the air in 1972.
13. To begin to operate. Used especially of lights and other electrical devices: After the movie was over, the lights went on.
14. To begin taking some drug or medication regularly: I went on a mild painkiller after the operation.
15. To do something. Used as a command or encouragement: Go on, have another drink.
16. To proceed to some place: We went on to the next exhibition. After a brief stay in Moscow, we went on to St. Petersburg. After high school I went on to a two-year college. The winner of this match will go on to the third round.
17. To proceed to do something next, often later in life: Without pausing, she went on to talk about the mountains. He went on to become a senator years later. The winner of this match will go on to face the champion.
18. To base one's judgment on something; go by something: Going on the few symptoms that we could observe, we were able to diagnose the patient. Without a witness, the police had nothing to go on.
19. To talk continuously; rattle on: Every time we see them, they go on about their child's good grades. Do you have to go on like that?
20. To stop telling stories that are not believed or are considered preposterous. Used only as a command: Now go on—you know there are no such things as dragons.
21. To be close to some age. Used only in the progressive: My sister is going on 23. I was going on 10 when I changed schools.


1. n. a drinking or drugging spree. Larry is the type who likes a good binge every now and then.
2. n. any spree of self-indulgence: emotional, gluttonous, etc. About Thanksgiving time I start a monthlong eating binge.
3. in. to drink heavily. She binges about once a month and is stone-cold sober the rest of the time.


mod. alcohol intoxicated. She sat there, binged out of her mind.
See also: binge
References in periodicals archive ?
Binge drinking was defined as consuming an amount corresponding to at least 37 cl of spirits at a single occasion in 2002.
The research shows that persons who binge eat have increased psychiatric problems and psychological distress.
Jack Law, the charity's chief executive, said: 'The message that going out to get drunk is perfectly normal, acceptable behaviour is not helpful when Scotland faces a growing NHS, social work and criminal justice bill caused by our binge drinking culture.
Researchers think their study still may underestimate the scope of binge drinking.
However, in women diagnosed as binge eaters--whether obese or lean--that change in preference also translated into a change in eating choices, the Michigan researchers report in the June American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Everybody knows about anorexia and bulimia; however, binge eating disorder affects more people, is often associated with severe obesity and tends to persist longer,'' Hudson says.
They found that of women who had never drank heavily in high school (if at all), nearly half admitted to heavy episodic drinking - commonly called binge drinking-at least once by the end of their first college semester.
Whether that response leads to eating binges or other PMS symptoms remains unknown, notes PMS researcher Robert L.
Safer is launching a study on binge eating treatment and is now recruiting volunteers.
By the end of the 6-week treatment, the citalopram (Celexa) group had a significant trend over time toward a greater reduction in the number of binges per week (from 5.
Bulimia is characterized by episodes of binge eating accompanied by feelings that the binges are abnormal and cannot be controlled.
As in the current trial, patients taking an SSRI showed significant overall improvement, a decrease in frequency of binges and a reduction in weight.
The findings were similar in individuals with binge-eating disorder (BED): Gastric capacity was greater than in normal controls (by both subjective and objective criteria) and was associated with the lifetime number of binges.
We learned last week the former England star (inset) went on an "incredible, seven-hour gambling binge," betting up to pounds 4,000 on the turn of a card.