bind down

bind someone or something down

to tie or secure someone or something to something. Bind the tarpaulin so it won't get away. We will bind down the patient tightly. They bound the hatch down so it could not be opened.
See also: bind, down
References in classic literature ?
It's enough to make one mad to hear volks talk; if I was going to marry myself, then she would ha reason to cry and to blubber; but, on the contrary, han't I offered to bind down my land in such a manner, that I could not marry if I would, seeing as narro' woman upon earth would ha me.
But this is the custom: for if the law were to bind down a free and independent citizen to keep his word with the public, what would become of the liberty of the subject?
That the oath taken at the start of each session of Congress is meant to bind down elected officials with the document's chains?
We must bind down all branches of the government with the chains of the Constitution.
It is one of the great chains intended to bind down the giant European Gulliver while the Lilliputians in Brus sels celebrate not just peace in our time but peace for all time.
Nowhere does one read anything even remotely comparable to the passage that Jefferson inserted in his draft of the Kentucky Resolutions of 1798, arguing that "confidence is everywhere the parent of despotism," that "free government is founded in jealousy, and not in confidence," and that "it is jealousy and not confidence which prescribes limited constitutions, to bind down those whom we are obliged to trust with power.
It is precisely individuals like Pastor and Slaughter--and their fellow globalists inside of and outside of government--whom Jefferson admonished that we should bind down "from mischief by the chains of the Constitution.
They would, as Jefferson put it, bind down with chains those who govern to keep them from mischief.