big-name


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big-name

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
Ole, Stale and Henning were big-name players who left here but failed in British football as managers.
Viewers are more interested in the content of a programme as opposed to big-name presenters' payments.
Some 62 per cent are more likely to boast about a beauty bargain product compared to an expensive one and 63 per cent admit they would happily ditch big-name products they've used for years for non-branded, bettervalue alternatives.
The Chancellor is to unveil a Au154 million blitz on big-name global companies and wealthy individuals who dodge tax bills to claw back billions of pounds for the Treasury.
REPORT; PLUS ALL THE EUROPA LEAGUE ACTION PAGES 46,47 more convincingly big-name new Cole, against Sunday of onWednesday, a second-half Debutant Christian
The Blues are desperate for a big-name signing to boost ticket sales at the 27,000 state-of-the-art stadium to be shared with Cardiff City at Leck with.
In October, Al-Jazeera announced it had signed its first big-name Western journalist: Sir David Frost.
Clarke, Robert Silverberg, and many big-name authors.
The huge Ropewalk complex will house more than 30 big-name stores in 205,000sqft of retail space - the equivalent to five football pitches.
Best of all, he gets paid for it as a "cool hunter" who works for "the client," a big-name company that specializes in athletic wear through Mandy, their marketing agent.
WHAT a start to the William Hill Derby at Wimbledon, and connections of Farloe Marathon could be excused for feeling a little miffed as he is just about the only big-name casualty so far.
Larry Flick needs to learn his queer rock history ["Return of the Pansys," September 16]: "The rock world is still bereft of big-name out, loud, and proud guitar slingers"?
Instead visitors saw live, interactive videos of processing demonstrations and sat down for one-on-one discussions with big-name processing experts.
Gates thought it unlikely the club would be able to attract a big-name manager to the north-east.
The big-name services, such as MSN or AOL, tend to focus on urban areas, ignoring the smaller communities.